Are You The Ultimate Allen School Fan?

You know how awesome it is to be a student here. You have great instructors, a support team to help you every step of the way. You are going to go out into the world and be the king or queen of all healthcare interns ever…. But do you know all the other ways you can show that you are the ultimate Allen School fan?

 

  1. Social Media!! – We are everywhere. We have Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, Google+, Linked-In, Pinterest, and more. If you want to know what we are up to and support your fellow students be sure to like us, follow us, tweet us, snap us, and show off your own moments of triumph during class, intern, and beyond. You can even show off your Allen School pride with our great Facebook Frames.

 

  1. Testify – You’ve seen the posters on the wall and on the website. Want to share your own story? Send us your testimonial and picture to theallenschool@gmail.com and we will share it with everyone. You never know who else you may inspire to change their life through education just like you did.

 

  1. Buy the Swag – Please check out our awesome school store. We have some really great stuff in there that will help you show off your Allen School spirit. Imagine someone on the subway asks you about your awesome Allen School shirt and all of a sudden you have a new classmate. Wouldn’t that be the greatest feeling in the world? Check out the store here.

 

  1. Hash It Out – #AllenSchool, #AllenSchoolStrong, #GreatestMedicalAssistantEver. The sky is the limit when it comes to tagging. We want to see your best hashtag so we can share your Allen School success with everyone.

 

  1. Buy the DVD?? – Just kidding, there is no DVD. We would love to see your success though and invite all of our students to take part in our “I Got Hired” video series. You can either visit the student services department or make your own video and send it to us at theallenschool@gmail.com it’s very easy. Just hit record and tell us who you are, where you got hired, and how much you love the Allen School.

 

Our students mean everything to us and we want to share your success at every step of the way. So please check us out on Social Media, share your greatest moments, and become the ultimate Allen School fan!!


Tips for Keeping Fit in Fall

For much of the country fall is almost here. Days are getting cooler and shorter and it can be more difficult than ever to get the exercise you need to stay healthy and fit. Today let’s look at some  great tips from the Huffington Post on staying healthy and active in the fall months.

 

  1. Enjoy the Foliage – Get outside and enjoy the turning leaves. A brisk walk under the autumn canopy will not only excite your sense, it probably won’t even feel like you are exercising.
  2. Layer Up – Layer your clothing so that as you get warm while exercising you can take off layers and stay comfortable. The more you enjoy your work out the more likely you are to keep exercising
  3. Take a Cue from the Kids – Go take a class. We know you are busy with work and school yourself, but now is a great time to take a class you have always wanted to try. From fencing to spinning, or even martial arts, a structured class setting will help keep you motivated and keep your exercise regimen on track.
  4. Work Out at Home – After a day of school and work the last thing you may want to do is hit the gym, especially as the weather gets colder and the days get shorter. Look for some easy ways to work out at home. Better yet involve your kids and keep everyone healthy and moving.
  5. Eat Those Fall Treats – No not candy corn and pumpkin spice lattes…..hit the farmers market and get fresh and nutritious foods like squash, sweet potatoes, and apples.

If you like these tips and want some more ideas of how to stay healthy as the fall season comes please check out the full article here.

Always remember as a healthcare provider the best thing you can do for your patients is lead by example. By staying fit and healthy all season not only will you be ready to provide the best patient care, but you can easily encourage your patient’s to stay fit and healthy as well.


Warning! Look out for Ticks!

Deadly Tick Virus

Summertime is tick season.  Ticks are familiar to most, especially dog owners. A common disease that ticks are known for carrying is Lyme disease. Unfortunately, there is a fatal virus that is getting a lot of attention throughout the nation. Powassan (POW) virus is transferred to humans through a tick bite as well, but its effects are far more deadly. Typically, this disease is transmitted to individuals in the Great Lakes and Northeastern region of the United States.

Signs and Symptoms

A few signs and symptoms to be aware of include: vomiting, headache, fever, fatigue, seizers, confusion and memory loss. In more severe cases long -term neurologic issues may ensue. If you think you or a family member may have contracted POW then contact your healthcare provider immediately

Preventative Options

Reduce the odds of infection by wearing long pants and sleeves, use tick repellent, and avoid wooded and forested areas. Remember; always check for ticks after spending time outdoors.

Allen School of Health Sciences Medical Assistant and Nursing Assistant students we want you to enjoy these warmer months, but also remain informed about viruses like POW. By staying in the know it helps to keep you and your loved ones safe. Learn more about POW on Center of Disease Control and Prevention website.


It’s Graduation Time!!

Congratulations Graduates

Congratulations Allen School of Health Sciences Graduates! Completing your program and graduating will be one of the greatest accomplishments in your life. Revel in this moment as you have completed a huge milestone and can now proudly address yourself as a healthcare professional.

This time of year is always filled with excitement as the Allen School Health Sciences hosts commencement for all of our Nursing Assistant, Medical Assistant and Medical Billing and Coding students.

Allen School would like to thank all of our graduates for choosing us as your school of choice to help take your healthcare career to the next level. We would also like to thank our faculty and staff who work diligently to provide an excellent student experience while preparing our students for the medical field.

Class of 2017, the Allen School is proud to call you family and now Alumni! Our Phoenix Campus had a beautiful ceremony this month. We look forward to our New York ceremony in June where we will celebrate the success of not only our campus students, but also our online students. We are excited to meet the family and friends who have assisted in our student’s success and have kept them motivated throughout their journey.


Why is Education Important to YOU?

Five Reasons WHY Education is Important

If becoming a healthcare professional is in the forefront of your mind then completing your education must be a priority. Consider these five reasons why education is important as you consider your future:
1. Dreams into Reality – Do you want to elevate yourself and go beyond your current employment position? Do want to strive for more than you already have? Do you want to be a healthcare professional? If so, then the first step is to earn the necessary education to accomplish your career goals.

2. Confidence – Earning your post-secondary education gives you added confidence not only in the workplace, but also in your day-to-day life.

3. Society – There are both spoken and unspoken rules within our society. Higher education is no longer an advantage, instead an expectation.

4. Money – It is needed to survive and live the life you want. Do you want more career opportunities to meet financial needs? Broaden your career options by earning the proper education to qualify.

5. Respect – When you see healthcare professionals in scrubs there is a noticeable level of respect they receive from peers, patients and strangers. They made a choice to go to school, earn their degree or certificate and can now proudly wear a respected uniform to match their highly regarded position.
If you are ready to take action and stop dreaming about a healthcare career then please contact the Allen School today. Our spring Healthcare programs are enrolling now at all of our locations! Please visit our website at www.allenschool.edu or call us directly at 877-591-8753.


Tips to Help You Ace A Phone Interview

Phone interviews are becoming increasingly more popular. Recruiters want to prescreen potential candidates before they invite them in for a face-to-face interview.  Healthcare professionals should be prepared before a phone interview with a potential hiring manager. Forbes shared some insight as to how to have a successful phone interview.

Preparation

  • Research the company’s history
  • Be in a quiet and comfortable area
  • Print out your resume and highlight key points
  • Have a note pad handy
  • Have questions prepared prior to the call

While the phone interview is being conducted

  • Fully listen before speaking
  • Smile while speaking – it makes a difference
  • End the call on a positive note

Post Interview

  • Immediately send a thank-you email
  • Have not heard anything back? Follow up in a week

Healthcare professionals, follow these steps the next time you have a phone interview. Keep in mind that healthcare is a competitive market. Always make sure to go the extra mile to stand out from other Nursing Assistants, Medical Assistants or Medical Billing and Coding candidates. If you have any phone interview tips that aren’t listed then please let us know!


Tips to Get YOUR Resume in Shape

Recent healthcare graduates with limited work experience sometimes struggle with creating a resume that catches an employer’s attention. With many graduates vying for similar job openings, it’s important to set yourself a part from the competition. Making yourself marketable can still be accomplished with limited work experience. Below are the top five resume tips from professionals in the healthcare field.

  1. Volunteer – Take advantage of healthcare volunteer opportunities. The Allen School offers multiple healthcare volunteer opportunities for students each month. Through the Institution for HOPE Campaign students can strengthen their resume and relevant volunteer experience.
  2. No Blank Spaces – It is a red flag for recruiters if there is blank space on a resume. Shade out the space with words. Add another bullet point, more relevant volunteer experience or awards received if necessary to fill the space. Allen School offers students the ability to qualify for Honor Roll, Attendance Awards, and Student of the Module as well as Valedictorian which are great accomplishments to add to a resume.
  3. Key Terms – Recruiters use software that searches for certain key words. Include, healthcare terms on your resume, so it stands out and potentially gets pulled for an interview! Incorporate words such as: certified, certificate, direct patient care, phlebotomy, EKG, ICD-10 etc.
  4. Put Numbers – For example, give an estimate as to how many patients you assisted on a daily bases or the amount of employees managed. Do not keep the potential employers guessing.
  5. Two Resumes – Have a medical resume and a separate resume with your past career experience. Always make sure that the resume being submitted is relevant to the job listing.

Recent healthcare graduates implement these tips and see how it makes a difference throughout the job search process. Some of these tweaks may seem small, but can make a significant difference to potential employers. If you are an Allen School student or graduate contact Career Services for more tips on how to become a stand out candidate.


Tips to be Successful From Our Current MIBC Ambassadors

Much to many people’s surprise the Allen School of Health Sciences is national. A lot of prospective and current students assume that we are located in only Brooklyn and Queens, New York; however, we do offer a Medical Billing and Coding program online. The online program caters to those students that are not able to physically come to school due to work demands, proximity, childcare issues, etc.
Recently, a few of the Module 1 Ambassadors had a chance to discuss their experiences at the Allen School of Health Sciences, to tell a bit about their background, interests and ultimately share a few of their best practices for being successful in their classes. All of them live in different states, have different hobbies and diverse backgrounds, but they all share common threads that link them such as their passion for the program and academic excellence.
We would like to share with you some of the advice and tips these MIBC Module 1 Ambassadors shared for current and prospective MIBC students:
• Create a schedule/routine for studying and homework
• Do not fall behind – Attendance and Participation is important
• Form a study group with classmates
• Speak up – If you have a question or concern then ask for clarification
• Take it day-by-day, so you do not get overwhelmed
Hopefully, these tips will be useful as you take the next step into starting the MIBC program. If healthcare is your passion and you would like to advance your career we encourage you to take a leap and find out more information about our MIBC Online program and the array of campus programs offered. To speak with an advisor contact us at 1-888-429-0046. We look forward to speaking with you!


Celebrating American Red Cross Month

March is American Red Cross month. In honor of one of the nation’s leading humanitarian organizations the Allen School of Health Sciences would like to thank them for their efforts. The Red Cross has been a fixture in communities throughout the nation and even in various parts of the world for numerous years. Although the organization is known for quite a few philanthropic works. Their mission is simple but impactful, “The American Red Cross prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors.”

According to the American Red Cross, volunteers, employees and supporters of the Red Cross focus on five critical concerns:  

– People affected by disasters in America

– Support for members of the military and their families

– Blood collection, processing and distribution

– Health and safety education and training

– International relief and development

At the Allen School of Health Science we pride ourselves on giving back to the community. We have demonstrated this through our Institution for HOPE (Helping Other People Endure) Campaign which strongly encourages students and their families to get involved. In efforts to make a change and difference in your local area the Allen School of Health Sciences challenges you to volunteer! If you are interested in learning more about the American Red Cross and possible volunteer opportunities; please, click the link to learn more http://www.redcross.org/


Celebrating Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History month, and in celebration of that we’d like to share with you a few of the amazing women who have influenced healthcare both in the past and today.

Clara Barton – She played a major role in the Civil War as a nurse, helping wounded soldiers, but her most incredible contribution to healthcare is that she is the founder of the American Red Cross. The Red Cross was founded in 1881 and today aids in disaster relief around the country. In her honor March is also American Red Cross month.

Dr. Virginia Apgar – Dr. Apgar developed the Apgar Score Test in 1951 to provide standardized evaluation of the health of a new born infant. This test was vital prior to the use of fetal monitors and scored infants based on things like their skin tone, breathing, reflexes, pulse, and muscle tone.

Selma Kaderman Dritz – She is an Epidemiologist and was the Assistant Director of San Francisco’s Bureau of Communicable Disease Control. Her research laid the basis for understanding AIDS and the HIV Virus. She was also on the frontline of prevention and education efforts to help curb the spread of the virus.

Gertrude Belle Elion – She was a chemist and after losing her grandfather to cancer she vowed to find a cure. She created the medication Purinethol, the first chemotherapy drug used to fight leukemia. Over the course of her career she created 45 different cancer treatments and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1988 for her work in the field.

Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler – Dr. Crumpler was the first African American woman to earn a medical degree. She devoted her life to helping those in the African American Community. When the Civil War ended she relocated her practice to Richmond, Virginia to address the needs of the newly freed African American population in the south.

These of course are just a small handful of the incredible people and contributions that have been made by women to the field of medicine over the years. There are many others who have contributed remarkable innovations that have shaped every aspect of the healthcare field. We hope you take some time to do your own research and find even more  heroes like these to inspire you as you begin your own career in healthcare.