Zero Unemployment In Many Medical-Related Fields

OK, so I cannot say that Medical Billing and Coding made the list, but a recently published list of the Top 10 college majors with the lowest unemployment rates after graduation contained no fewer than 3 medically-related fields.  The list put out by Liz Godwin at the Lookout was mirrored by recent research performed by the Wall Street Journal showing that majors in the following job fields all enjoy between 0-2% unemployment rates:Majors and their unemployment rate:1. Actuarial Science—0 percent2. Astronomy and Astrophysics—0 percent3. Educational Administration and Supervision—0 percent4. Geological and Geophysical Engineering—0 percent5. Pharmacology—0 percent6. School Student Counseling—0 percent7. Agricultural Economics—1.3 percent8. Medical Technologies Technicians—1.4 percent9.Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology—1.6 percent10. Environmental Engineering, Nursing, and Nuclear Industrial Radiology and Biological Technologies—2.2 percentClick here to read the whole article. If you are trained to work in medical offices as a billing and coding professional, you’re entering a field where there is categorically high employment.

Good Resource for Job Hunting

The much ballyhooed takeover of AOL by the Huffington Post has yielded a very comprehensive resource for people seeking new employment.  If you’ve recently earned your Medical Billing and Coding certificate from Allen School Online, or if you’re soon to earn yours, you may be apprehensive about the looming job search.  It is true that finding gainful employment these days is more challenging than it has been in quite some time.  You’ll need any advantage you can come by if you’re to succeed.  Luckily, an Allen School certificate is one such advantage.  But it won’t land you the position you want if your resume, interviewing skills and salary negotiation chops are weak.  So take a look at the new Huffington Post/AOL Jobs and Career section for the latest and greatest tips and strategies for landing the dream gig.  Check back frequently because the content there is update rapidly and there’s always something new and useful to be found.

From Humble Beginnings

Every recent report on the economy tells the same story with regard to the employment outlook.  For many industries, the outlook remains bleak.  Yet, throughout the devastating recession we still endure, the Medical industry continues to show solid, unwavering growth.  The imminent retirement of the Baby Boomer generation pretty much guarantees that those in the medical field will continue to be in high demand.This is a likely reason why you’ve decided to pursue a career in medical billing and coding at the Allen School Online.  But do you ever allow yourself to dream a little bigger?  The basis of understanding you’ll gain through your training here and subsequent immersion into the offices of doctors, surgeons and hospitals could act as a springboard for an even more intensive career in medicine.  Now, it’s not for everyone to aspire to rise up through the ranks from billing specialist to nurse, to nurse practitioner to eventually a medical doctor.  Nonetheless, it is not outside the realm of possibility.  It is likely that some of our Allen School Online grads will feel compelled to use their training as a springboard into full on medical careers.  I know many of you are probably thinking, “well, that couldn’t be me” and “my grades were never strong enough to get into med school”.  To you I say, consider Naomi’s story.Naomi (that’s her in the pic above) is currently enrolled in med school and studying to become a doctor.  But, she didn’t start out with that as her career plan in high school or even in college.  Yet, at her blog, www.get-into-medicalschool.com she shares her story and tips on how through hard work, perseverance and unshakable belief in yourself, you too could achieve what may seem like an impossible dream.  Even as most of you may not be driven to become doctors, I still recommend checking out her blog and gaining some inspiration from her story and her drive to succeed.  It almost certainly mirrors your own!  And for those of you who may be interested to learn what’s involved in taking this bold step in the future, Naomi’s “how to take the MCAT” page is chock full of great info.

Top 10 Most Hated Jobs – Not One In Healthcare!

So, CNBC recently published a report listing the top ten most hated jobs based on a survey they took of workers in many fields.  You’ll be happy to learn that not a single one of these odious employment opportunities was in the healthcare field.  The top 10 worst jobs are:1.  Director, Information Technology2.  Director, Sales and Marketing3.  Product Manager4.  Senior Web Developer5.  Tech Specialist6.  Electronics Technician7.  Law Clerk8.  Tech Support Analyst9.  CNC Machinist10.  Marketing ManagerSo, this blogger is happy for all you Allen School Online students who will NOT be entering a hated field.  Please feel sorry for me though.  I am a marketing director/manager, web developer and product manager for a living.  Maybe it is my cheerful natural disposition that keeps me from hating my job.

Perseverance

We all have days when we feel like life’s challenges are just more than we can overcome.  If you’re feeling stretched thin, perhaps as you’re trying to train for a job in a new career field.  Or maybe you simply struggle to keep studies, work and family responsibilities from falling by the wayside.  Whatever your personal struggles, remember that the secret to success is to never give up.  Never give in.  PERSEVERE!Consider the story of Brandon Mulnix of Michigan.  Mulnix’s jaw was wired shut after injuries he sustained in a car wreck.  Yet he was scheduled to run a marathon.  A person with less perseverance might have opted to skip the 26 mile run.  But not Brandon.  He stuck to the task, no matter how large the obstacle in his path and completed the run in spite of his inability to consume solid foods for nutrition and energy.Kind of puts your struggles into perspective no?  Excelsior!

Job Hunting Blogs – A Link to Real World Experiences

Getting your certification is a wonderful thing, but now it is time to turn your attention and efforts to finding a new position with your newly minted qualifications.  With the economy in turmoil and the effects of this volatility on the labor market, the rules of job hunting are changing day to day.  What may have been conventional wisdom about how to write a resume, how to handle interviews or how to negotiate compensation is potentially no longer relevant.  In many cases, what used to be a strategy for success has become a recipe for failure.The best way to know what is working (and what is not) in real time is to read the shared experiences of other job seekers who are also currently out there dealing with resumes, human resources, hiring managers, etc.  The best job hunting blogs have shared experiences posted daily and that fresh input can be of immense value to the job hunter.  I recommend Jobhuntingblogs.org which is a wonderful compilation of the best job hunting blogs out there.I also like guerrillajobhunting Get a fresh look at what is working for others and you can get ahead in the hunt! Also, share your experiences in the comments below to help fellow Allen School Online students in their search.

Top 10 Cities for Medical Billing/Coding Careers

Medical Billing and Coding, Vallejo, CAThe AllHealthCare section of Monster.com compiled a list of the top 10 best cities for people pursuing careers in medical assistant/billing/coding.   The list goes into a bit of detail for each city explaining why it made the list.  Of course, the most prominent contributing factor is the average pay for workers in the field.  But there are many other reasons to live in all of the cities listed.  Here are the top five and the average annual salary figures for each.CITY                             AVG. PAY1)  Vallejo, CA                 $45,0002)  Danbury, CT              $37,0003)  San Francisco, CA   $37,0004)  Salinas, CA                 $35,0005)  Oakland, CA               $34,500The rest of the list and more detailed information on the above cities can be viewed here.

Negotiating Salary In Tough Economic Times

You’re a certified medical billing and coding professional in a field that is predicted to continue to grow.  Yet unemployment is still near historic highs and there are more applicants than jobs available, even in high growth fields.  So, it is not a good time to ask for a higher starting salary (or a raise if you’re already employed) right?  Wrong!  Good help, as the old saying goes, is hard to find.  Employers are always happy to have quality, highly trained people working hard for their organizations.  Knowing how to negotiate salary can help you earn what you’re worth even in tough times.  Michael Chaffers at Monster.com writes this list of Top Ten Tips for Salary Negotiations.  Read it and arm yourself with the knowledge needed to get what you’re worth as an Allen School Online graduate!

Best Hospitals of 2011-12

US News and World Report has released its list of the top hospitals for 2011-12.  This is interesting as it shows where some of the most sought after jobs might be for Allen School Online graduates.  The rankings include hospitals in 15 states so there’s lots of choices if you’re seeking to move to a specific area to begin your new career.  View the list here.

Noticeably Absent

Noticeably absent from this depressing article about the disappearance of middle class jobs was any mention of declining numbers of available careers in medical fields.  The middle class squeeze, as we all know, has hit hard at industries like manufacturing where thousands of jobs in factories and assembly lines have been sent overseas to “low cost labor markets”  like China and India or automated with robotics and other technologies.  But this article showed the top five hardest hit career fields outside of manufacturing.  They were:Travel AgentsFive-year decline: 14%Vocational Education Middle School TeachersFive-year decline: 14.4%Broadcast News AnalystsFive-year decline: 15.9%Agricultural EngineersFive-year decline: 18.4%Transit and Rail PoliceFive-year decline: 18.7%Notice what was (thankfully) not included in this sad list?  If you said, “medical industry jobs”, give yourself a prize!