Choosing the Online Program Path for the New Year

As the nation’s population ages, the demand for health care workers is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years. One exciting way for you to get into the growing health care industry is by training to become a medical billing and coding specialist. Of course, training for a new career is a big commitment and we know that not everybody has the time for sitting in on classes. Fortunately, the Allen School of Health Sciences offers an online program for those interested in medical billing and coding. By studying online, you’ll get the training you need to enter this booming industry while also working at your own pace and on your own schedule.What is ?Medical billing and coding are two separate jobs, although in small offices they are sometimes combined as one job. A medical billing specialist works with insurance companies to process claims so that a medical office can be reimbursed for health care services that it has provided. Billing specialists also work with patients to make sure patient data is processed correctly and that patients are billed properly.Medical billing and CodingMedical coding specialists typically don’t work with patients or insurance companies as often as billing specialists do. Patient data and bills have specific codes attached to them, which helps ensure the office runs smoothly. The coding specialist is responsible for entering and keeping track of these codes. As a coding specialist you will be spending a lot of time entering data, so ideally you will be attentive to detail and comfortable working with a computer. At the Allen School of Health Sciences you will also be trained in how to use the ICD-10 coding system, which is the latest coding system used in medical offices throughout the United States.Advantages of studying onlineAside from being a growing field, another great advantage of studying Medical Billing and Coding at the Allen School is that you can do your studies online. Studying online is a great option if you need a program that works with your schedule. You may have other commitments, for example, such as a family to raise or a job during the daytime that make sitting in on classes and commuting to campus unfeasible. By studying online, you will be able to take your education into your own hands. As with our other programs, you may also be eligible for financial aid and benefits.The demand for medical billing and coding specialists is high and it is expected to keep growing. If you’re ready to start a career in a booming and exciting field, then don’t delay! Get in contact with us today and we can give you more information about how to train to become a medical billing and coding specialist.

Medical Billing and Coding Training in Summer’s Swelter

Trying to complete your medical billing and coding training during the height of the summer’s heat and other distractions is as hard.  Its equally hard for people working on other projects from earning a certified nursing assistant degree to focusing on the needs of patients while working in a medical office.  The tendency is to want to slow down, or even take some time away from studies/work to go loaf at the pool, or in the air condition somewhere.  In fact, recent studies indicate that worker productivity slumps by as much as 20% in the summer months.The cool geeks over at www.lifehacker.com put together a “how to” piece, full of tips on how to maintain high levels of productivity in spite of seasonal distractions. The list includes advice ranging from changing the thermostat setting to switching up your work routine to working during different hours.  Not all of these may be feasible for those who’ve completed their medical billing and coding training and now maintain set working hours in a medical office.  However for students still studying medical billing and coding, certified nursing assistant training or any of the other courses offered here at the Allen School, these suggestions may just be what the doctor ordered.  Click here to read LifeHacker’s interesting article and sound off in the comments about how you beat the heat and stay focused on the work all summer long.

BLS: 19,000 Medical Office Jobs Added in April Alone!

The Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes an Employment Situation Summary wherein it examines the state of hiring in different career fields.  The latest Summary revealed that in April 2012 alone, more than 19,000 new jobs in medical fields were added to the American workforce.  That’s quite an impressive number given the overall sad state of affairs regarding employment in general.  Better yet, the top of the list, the number one job title in the medical field for new jobs added in April was none other than Medical Assistant.  Also in the top 5 was Medical Records and Health Information Technician.  Aren’t you pumped to be involved in studies at the Allen School Online now?  Compared to students in other fields of study, this report would indicate that you’ll have an easier time finding work once you receive your certification than others.  You’re so smart!

You Can Do This!

If you’re just starting out in your studies of medical billing and coding or medical office assistant with the Allen School Online, you may be feeling like it is a challenge you cannot overcome.  Perhaps you decided to make a career change in mid-life and this new career path seems daunting.  Well, the following story ought to serve to inspire you and make you feel that with enough determination, anything is possible.  Take it from a 6-year-old who raised more than $10,000 to help his cancer-stricken father.  You can do this!

Medical Office Attire Around the World

Not entirely relevant to the topic of medical billing and coding or medical assistant training, however, I thought it was pretty interesting to see the different sartorial practices of medical office professionals in different countries around the world.  This article in one of my very most favorite geeky blogsites, www.boingboing.net published this image of a comparison between nursing/medical office attire from different lands.  What do you think?  Makes Spongebob themed scrubs seem strange in retrospect.

How to Become Indispensable in your New Medical Office Job

So you’ve gotten your medical billing and coding or medical office certificate from Allen School Online.  You’ve landed an exciting new position in the offices of a local physician or hospital.  Want to know the secrets of how to be the one person in the office they’d never even think of letting go?  Business Insider recently published this great article explaining how to become the indispensable member of the team.   The condensed version is:
  • Never take the shortcut.
  • Be adaptable, not rigid.
  • Be of service to others without expecting anything in return.
  • Be purpose-driven, not goal-driven.
  • Be assertive. Life is a game, so play big or go home.
  • Forgive others quickly.
For the details, read the whole article here.

Don’t Say That!

Foot in MouthOne of the most popular posts ever on the Allen School Online blog was entitled 10 Common Reasons People Get Fired!  You can read it here. No other post has generated anywhere close to the number of reader comments.  Probably because everyone knows a co-worker who does some of these “termination worthy” things (like failing to take a shower before work).Well, I think this post will be similarly popular.  It is based on an article published on Monster.com entitled, “Nine Things Never to Say In a Job Interview” and it contains almost as much cringe-worthy examples of ways people undermine their career prospects as the 10 Reasons People Get Fired piece.  Have a read and remember these things next time you’re interviewing for a job in medical billing and coding or medical office assistant.

Early Spring? Early (Allergy) Suffering

If you live in the Northeastern United States (as many Allen School and AS Online students do), you know we’ve been treated to a very early Spring.  After an exceptionally mild and mostly blizzard-free Winter, the temperatures have been in the mid-60s to 70s for the last 10 days or so.  The forecast is for over 70 degrees for much of the week this week.  In this blogger’s yard, the lilac bushes and forsythias have already begun to sprout early leaves.  While all this is a welcome occurrence, I know that I and many other seasonal allergy sufferers will be in for a bumper crop this pollen season.  While there’s very little you can do to stop the coming onslaught of pollen, there are steps you can take to alleviate the allergens in your home so you don’t suffer twice as much when the trees and flowers bloom.  Here’s a good piece from Men’s Health magazine about ways to minimize allergies in your home.  Enjoy this early Spring, and pass the tissues!

Non-Verbal Cues that Can Torpedo Your Job Interview

You only get one chance to make a first impression.  This is especially true in the interviewing for a job position.  With so many applicants for each available job, you need to put your very best foot forward.  Just try not to be tapping your best foot all through the interview.   Allen School Online students get a highly respected certification when they finish their studies of medical billing and coding.  However, no matter how good your grades are, and no matter how respected your education is, and no matter how articulate you may be in the interview, you can still blow it and not even know it.   The Wisebread.com blog site has a great piece up right now that chronicles some of the non-verbal or “body-language” cues that can distract an interviewer during your meeting.  Things like excessive staring (while trying to maintain good eye contact), bouncing one’s leg up and down (due to nervousness) or nodding too much (trying to indicate high levels of interest) can all be negatively interpreted by the hiring manager.  Click here to read the whole article and its list of “don’ts” for body language during the interview process.

Great Data from BLS on Medical Billing and Coding Employment

medicalbillingandcoding.org is chock full of tools and data you can use to learn more about the employment environment for your chosen career field. And I have to say, the data looks pretty good. The salary figures, the projected growth of the industry and other related statistics all point to a positive environment for jobs in medical billing and coding.  Stop by their site here and see for yourself.