Medical Assisting: Turning challenges into rewards

You dreamed of a Medical Assistant career where your life’s work would be all about helping others. You wanted to contribute your knowledge and compassion to a healthcare team that helps patients get well, but the profession has its challenges. So how do you turn those challenges into rewards and accomplishments you can be proud of? How can you do the job you love? Follow these steps:

  1. Accept diversity Not all your patients, or even all the people you work with, are going to think just like you. If you understand that fact from the get-go, you won’t look at differences as a bad thing. Instead, you’ll come to appreciate diversity and enjoy getting to know others. Learn about their cultures and ideas—and share yours. Isn’t it awesome that you get to meet so many different people as a Medical Assistant?
  2. Empower your patients No one enjoys being hurt or sick. All they want to do is get better. And as a Medical Assistant, you get to help them! Share what you’ve learned through your healthcare training at the Allen School of health Sciences and experiences you have learned working in the healthcare field, and you’ll give your patients some of the tools they need to get well. For example, you probably understand the importance of following a physician’s instructions to the T. You can explain the doctor’s instructions and turn medical terminology into a language your patients can understand. All that info helps your patients take charge of their own care. The more they do what they’re supposed to, the sooner they’ll be on the mend.
  3. Advocate for your patients How can doctors possibly help patients if they don’t have all the details of what’s going on? Since you might spend more time with patients than even their doctors, you could have vital information that will improve their treatment. Encourage your patients to be completely open and honest about how they feel and tell their doctor. But when they don’t, it’s your job to make certain the healthcare staff knows what they need to make good decisions for the best patient care. Communication can be a challenge in any setting, but your patients rely on you to have their best interest at heart. And their good health and sincere appreciation is a great reward.
  4. Acknowledge your own limitations It’s frustrating to deal with difficult patients. It’s hard when you really can’t make someone better and when you don’t have all the answers. But you’re not supposed to! It’s important to remember what you can—and can’t—do as a Medical Assistant. Focus on the positive. You can offer kindness and comfort. A smile and a pleasant attitude can go a long way to turn grumpy patients into happy people. But when your positive disposition doesn’t work, don’t let it get you down.

The best reward about being a Medical Assistant is to know that you can make a difference in someone’s day, in their healthcare, and maybe even their life. If you’re up for a challenge because you really want to do something that matters, maybe a career as a Medical Assistant is right for you.

Interested in learning more about developing the skills and attributes of a Medical Assistant? Ready to start a Medical Assistant Program? At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assistant: Tips for a Virtual Interview

The global pandemic has up-ended upended how we connect and how we work. Working from home has become a new normal for now but may have lasting repercussions on how healthcare providers view the necessity of an office, in-person appointments or patient care. A video interview may well become the new norm. Nailing a video interview is likely to become another requirement for successful job seekers in the medical field. Here are some tips:

Acknowledge the situation:  We’re all adjusting to a weird new normal, working from our homes with family members and pets nearby. Of course, your interviewer would much rather meet you in person in their office environment but here’s the bright side, your video interview can be an opportunity to connect a little more authentically, with grace and good humor. No doubt your interviewer’s business has been radically affected by the global pandemic. Express your appreciation for the interview taking place, despite the chaos unfolding all around.

Practice using technology: Make the time to have a video call with a tech-savvy friend (or teen in your world) ahead of time on the platform that you’ll be using (Zoom, GoToMeeting, Skype, FaceTime, etc.). If you are unfamiliar with the technology, fumbling with it 15 minutes before the video call is a rookie move. Select a place to have the video call where you’ll be uninterrupted.

Figure out the lighting and a background that appears professional. Be sure that your computer audio is working. Make sure that if you have to accept a connection ahead of time (as with Skype) that you’ve done so and your user name sounds professional. Make sure your technology is charged up and that your Wi-Fi signal is strong. If all else fails, ensure you have the phone number of your interviewer on hand so that your interview can continue even if the video technology fails.

Dress and act the part: Dress as you would for an in-person meeting. You’ll want to appear professional, serious and ready to get to work, even if from your basement. Dressing up beyond your normal work from home sweatpants and a tee shirt will also shift your mindset to a more professional one as well as help you stay focused during the interview. Remember to maintain eye contact, no quick movements and pause your communication to allow for transmission delays.

Make a friend first:  As with any interview, you’ll want to be friendly, relatable and establish rapport at the outset. Your goal is to come across as a potential colleague. Be yourself but look for common points of connection (mutual friends, experiences, academic background, interests).

Have answers to important questions: Every Medical Assistant candidate should be prepared with solid answers to the following:

  • Tell me about the experience you have as a Medical Assistant. Internship work counts.  (It’s good to know how much experience candidates have as a Medical Assistant).
  • Why are you right for the role?  What do you uniquely bring in terms of experience, leadership and personal attributes that make you a good fit for the company?
  • Do you have experience handling front office obligations? Are you comfortable answering phones and greeting patients? Medical Assistants are often tasked with doing a mix of administrative and clinical work.
  • What phlebotomy training have you had if any? Drawing blood is part of the Medical Assistant’s job. (Be ready to talk about your phlebotomy training, comfort with taking blood and your ability to take patients’ vitals).

Follow up, even if they don’t. After your interview is over, send a warm thank you email within 24 hours. Express your enthusiasm for the company and the role and make sure to reference something from your conversation. If you are interviewing with multiple people, make each email different (yes, colleagues compare thank you emails).

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future medical assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Back to School as a Working Adult

A growing number of career and vocational training schools now offer programs oriented toward working adults. People frequently enroll in career schools to acquire new skills for a new career. Accelerated programs and flexible schedules are making it easier and more convenient for working adults to finish school. Enrolling in a career school is a great way to make a career transition, learn new skills, study subjects of personal interest, and enhance marketability in a competitive job market. Unfortunately, many would-be students who desire a career change or wish to return to school, never wind up doing so due to fear.

The First Step is Admitting It

The following concerns and fears are shared by many working adults reluctant to return to school:

  • The cost of returning to school
  • The time commitment involved
  • The challenges of attending classes with younger students

Many are also concerned that their employers will be unimpressed with their new career. However, most working adults enrolling in career school, end up fitting in well and are more than up to the challenge of returning to school as an adult. They usually enroll with fear and concern, only to later realize that their fear and concern were unfounded.

I’m Afraid It Will Be Too Expensive

It can be expensive returning to school. The expense alone is enough to cause many working adults to reconsider their decision to return to school. However, when education is viewed as an investment, the cost of attending school does not seem as large of a sacrifice. It’s best to have a long term rather than short term perspective. Salary increases associated with obtaining more education often offset the cost of returning to school. Many schools are relatively inexpensive to attend. Before deciding against returning to school based on the cost, consider how this advanced training will help you in your current or new career.

I’m Afraid It Will Take Up Too Much Time

It’s not unreasonable for adult students to feel overwhelmed with their current responsibilities. As a result, returning to school can be that much more intimidating. Working full-time, raising a family, and fulfilling other responsibilities are enough to occupy already full schedules.

It is possible, however, to make time for returning to school; and many adults do it quite successfully. It may require sacrificing some leisurely activities, but it is possible to make the time. If you set a goal and have an unwavering commitment to reach it, you can develop the ability to make sacrifices that will allow you to accomplish your educational objectives.

I’m Afraid It Will Take Forever to Complete My Program

The Allen School of Health Sciences offers accelerated learning programs. As a result, these programs require less time than would be required if one pursued their degree the traditional way.  Educational quality is not sacrificed to speed through course material. Most students graduate their program in less than a year.

Why Make the Move?

Since many career schools cater exclusively to working students, there are few, if any, reasons why an adult should hesitate to return to school if they feel it makes sense. They can greatly benefit from the decision to further their education. The following are just a few of the many benefits of returning to school as an adult:

  • Promotion or career advancement opportunities: Returning to school is one way to improve your chances to get promoted, or it is one strategy for beginning a career transition.
  • Finish a started program: Many students find opportunities in the workforce before completing school. However, it is never too late to return and start a new career.
  • Demonstrate to your children and future generations the importance of education: If you set an example for your children, they are more than likely to attend school and enjoy the benefits a career can offer.

It may seem intimidating and daunting to enroll in school, but this should not be a reason for missing out on the benefits of acquiring more education. Adults who simply put together a good, workable plan can smoothly make the transition back to school and make the experience a great success.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future graduates.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assistant Externship

Medical Assistant Externship

You can learn a lot in the classroom, but you can’t learn everything, especially if you’re studying to be a Medical Assistant. This is a career that requires a lot of medical knowledge, as well as skills and professional attributes that can only be gained through hands-on experience. At the Allen School of Health Sciences, and in most Medical Assistant programs, that comes in the form of an externship: 275 hours in a healthcare facility. We want to prepare our students for all aspects of the work, and to help them prepare so we’ve written an outline of what to expect from your Medical Assistant externship.

Working under supervision

One of the greatest benefits of a Medical Assistant externship is the opportunity it provides to practice skills and duties while being supervised. In your classes, you’ll learn what and why Medical Assistants do what they do. However, the moment you take that knowledge into the real world with real patients, even the simplest things like taking blood pressure can be daunting. The good news is: You’re not alone.

Your supervisor will work with you closely, especially at the beginning, to ensure you remember everything you’ve learned in class. They will ensure you feel comfortable administering your duties. In addition to your guide, of sorts, your supervisor may also serve as your safety net to ensure you don’t miss anything. That aspect of supervision can and should relieve a lot of pressure. It’s common to feel nervous before you’ve gained your skills, practice, and habits, but a supervisor’s presence should relieve most of those fears.

You’ll also be able to observe your supervisor and coworkers perform procedures you’ll eventually perform yourself. It’s one thing to read about Medical Assisting in a textbook and quite another to witness in a working environment.

Asking a thousand questions

Your Medical Assistant externship should be a time to unleash your curiosity. These 275 clinical hours are trying, but they also provide an opportunity to learn all aspects of a job from the people who are doing it. In class, you’ll learn about best practices and why different medical procedures are done a certain way. In your externship, you can ask the less technical questions such as “how do you help nervous patients calm down?” and “why do we put away the files like this?”. Asking questions that interest you will make all aspects of the work more personal and will help the answers stick.

Learning the role

A big part of the job is all about communication. The authority with which you carry yourself, and the empathy you bring to patient interactions can’t be taught in a lecture. They’re skills, critical to the position, that you can only learn in your Medical Assistant externship. As you practice and observe the professionals around you, you’ll understand the interpersonal aspects of the work. When you begin your externship, you’ll feel like a student. Ideally, by the time you leave, you can expect to feel like you fit the role.

Gaining Confidence

As a result, you can expect at the end of your externship to feel confident in your abilities to be a Medical Assistant. Self-confidence is a huge part of any healthcare job, which can be challenging for students as it can’t be learned in a textbook or seminar. Gaining confidence in your ability to perform administrative and clinical duties requires practice, life experience, and supportive supervision. It requires, in other words, an externship where you won’t just learn how to be a Medical Assistant; you will become one.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants. In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Helpful tips to become a better Medical Assistant

Helpful tips to become a better Medical Assistant

For students in a Medical Assistant program you may be busy learning about the clinical aspects of the job, such as how to draw blood, administer an injection, or take a patient’s vital signs. These are clearly a very important part of your training. But in addition, there are also “soft skills” that are important to your training. Learning to be a reliable employee is a skill that can use throughout your entire career. Try these tips for getting a strong start in your new career.

1. Be an early bird

Plan to arrive at work 10 to 15 minutes early every day. You will need this time to put your belongings away and get ready for your work day. This gives you time to review the list of patients who are scheduled and to check on the day’s supplies. It helps you avoid the feeling of having to “hit the ground running” the minute you step in the door. By arriving early, you can start off your work day feeling calm and organized.

2. Stay positive

Work is called “work” for a reason — it’s hard work! Each day there may be tasks that you don’t enjoy, changes that you weren’t expecting, or problems that arise, but rather than griping or complaining, take a positive approach. Remember that handling problems is simply part of the job. Try to focus on the parts of the job that you do enjoy rather than the negative aspects. With a positive attitude, you will find that you inspire the others around you.

3. Carry your own weight

As a Medical Assistant, you will be part of a healthcare team in a medical office or a hospital setting. Others on your team might include nurses, office staff, physicians, and other MA’s. Each of them is counting on you to do your job. If you shirk your responsibilities, someone else will have to pick up your slack. Make sure you take your responsibilities seriously and put forth your best effort to fulfill your duties. As a team member, you should also be proactive. If you see a need that isn’t being fulfilled, see where you can help. This kind of approach helps make you a valuable member of your team.

4. Be respectful to anyone and everyone

Medical offices and hospitals are busy places. In the course of serving patients throughout the day, healthcare professionals can get stressed and hurried. Despite this, try to stay polite and respectful to everyone throughout the day. Showing respect to others will result in receiving their respect in return. This includes everyone you work with, from the newest employees to the head honchos. And most of all, it includes patients—even those who may test your patience. Being a respectful person is a career skill that should stay with you for your entire career.

5. Keep up your education

In a field like Medical Assisting, you need to be sure that you keep up with your learning. New technologies and medications are being created, and you want to be sure to stay on the cutting edge. Be sure to attend continuing education classes. Join a professional association and read their newsletters and blog articles regularly. Having up-to-date knowledge of your career field is something that you can be proud of and something that others will respect.

Following these tips is a way to “go the extra mile” as a Medical Assistant. If you follow these guidelines, you can improve your approach to your work. What’s more, the better you perform on the job, the better you will feel about your career.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering the necessary positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in future Medical Assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Tips to Help You Navigate Going Back to School to Become a Medical Assistant

Tips to Help You Navigate Going Back to School to Become a Medical Assistant

If you want to make a difference and help others, a career in healthcare could be the right path for you. Going back to school is never an easy decision, however, even if a healthcare career has always been your calling, there are a lot of factors to consider. Finding the right program will get you the help you need during your time in school, striking a balance between work, school and your personal life. Here are a few tips to help you navigate through your decision to go back to school.

1. Find a program that works for you

It’s important to find a school and program that can meet your individual needs as a student. Flexible schedules and online course offerings can make it easier for you to earn your certification while working or raising your family. Choosing a blended program can give you the best of both worlds. Interactive online experience provides both at home learning and hands on classroom training. If going to school with kids and a fulltime job seems impossible, fear not because there are options! Choosing a blended program will help you balance your work and family life thereby allowing you to be successful in school.

2. Ask for help if you need it

Everyone needs a little help from time to time. Your instructors want to see you succeed, and they will be there for you whenever you need extra help or support. It’s important to put your best foot forward and talk about any challenges you are facing with faculty and staff. At the Allen School of Health Sciences communication is key. We are here to support you every step of the way. Let us guide you to the correct resources for your situation. We are in this together and your success is our success.

3. Take advantage of other academic resources

There are a variety of resources to support you in your learning and career development. Be proactive about getting the support you need – whether it’s contacting the Career Services department, meeting with your academic director, or setting up make up hours with your instructor, you will find all of the resources you need for success at the Allen School of Health Sciences.

4. Believe in yourself

Maybe you always knew you wanted to help others, and a career in healthcare seemed like the perfect fit. It won’t always be an easy journey, but don’t give up. For nearly sixty years, the Allen School of Health Sciences has trained thousands of people for their new careers in healthcare. Why not you?

5. Don’t lose sight of your goals

No matter what challenges you face along the way, keep your eye on the prize and continue working to achieve your goals.  Your dedication and hard work will all be worth it in the end. At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering the necessary positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in future Medical Assistants.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, the Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.


Traits of a Successful Medical Assistant 

Traits of a Successful Medical Assistant 

Be it in a large hospital or small family practice, Medical Assistants are a necessary part of any healthcare organization. MA’s are essential healthcare professionals performing both clinical and administrative tasks. On any given day, an MA can find themselves answering phones, taking electrocardiograms, scheduling appointments, dealing with bookkeeping, or explaining a treatment plan to a patient. The world they live in is diverse, demanding, and necessary. The following are some of the personality traits that make for successful Medical Assistants.

Positivity

Medical Assistants are often the face of healthcare. They greet patients, answer telephones, and talk people through what’s happening with a given procedure or test. It’s common for patients to feel anxious or worried during an examination or treatment, so a positive attitude from the healthcare worker changing their dressing or running a test can make all the difference in a patient’s morale.

If a MA feels good about their job and their environment, then the patient will feel better about being a patient. A smile, an understanding answer to a question, or a reassuring explanation of a test are essential to effective healthcare.

Empathy

Healthcare workers often encounter patients at moments of vulnerability. MA’s will occasionally find themselves in a position where they are the closest human being to someone in a moment of emotional crisis. When that happens, it’s necessary for an MA to maintain their composure and have an appropriate empathic response to the patient.

Being a healthcare worker is a technical job, but it’s also a deeply human and caring one. Empathy will be essential for any MA in any patient interaction, be it routine or not.

Professionalism

Both the clinical and administrative sides of healthcare depend on an MA. They take medical histories, conduct blood draws, EKA tests and blood pressure. Care and precision are important in every situation, and there is often little room for error. Dedication to accuracy and precision will serve an MA well in all avenues of their professional career, and, in turn, their accuracy and precision will better serve others.

Integrity

Integrity is one of the Allen School of Health Sciences core values, and for good reason. As we say in our statement of values, EDUCATE:

  • • Education Quality & Integrity
  • • Dedication
  • • Understanding of Others
  • • Communication & Consistency
  • • Advisement & Achievement
  • • Teamwork & Technology
  • • Excellence.

Doctors, nurses, hospital administrative staff and most importantly patients depend on the work that Medical Assistants do. When an MA medical begins a shift, they are not just clocking in at work, they are devoting themselves to a career of service to others. At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering the necessary positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in future MA’s.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Get Medical Assistant Skills and Training Today with a Blended Format of Traditional and Online Classes.

Get Medical Assistant Skills and Training Today with a Blended Format of Traditional and Online Classes.

Today more than ever, it is abundantly clear that healthcare professionals stand on the front lines when it comes to keeping our world healthy, safe, and happy. In light of recent world events, much of society has gained a new appreciation for healthcare workers, along with a heightened understanding of how much these highly trained professionals contribute to our daily lives.

Whether you’ve long dreamed of a job in the medical field or have found yourself only recently inspired to pursue a healthcare career, the odds are that you’re well aware of the positive impact you can have on your future healthcare role.  If you’re hoping to work toward a healthcare career that you’re proud of, a career as a Medical Assistant may be the path you’ve been hoping to find.

Here’s everything you need to know about how to get the training needed to become a Medical Assistant, and why this career path is the right one for you. Have you ever considered a career as a Medical Assistant? You may be familiar with the job title, but not quite sure about what the role actually entails.

As a multi-skilled healthcare professional, a Medical Assistant takes on a wide range of responsibilities in the healthcare setting. Working under the direct supervision of a licensed healthcare provider, such as a physician, Medical Assistants can work in private and public medical offices, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and other medical facilities. Depending on experience, education, and interests, a Medical Assistant may opt to work in a specialty field such as internal medicine, pediatrics, dermatology, cardiology, or urology. Roles and responsibilities of a medical assistant can include:

● Taking vital signs

● Assisting with examinations and various procedures

● Drawing blood and collecting other lab samples

● Updating patient records

● Interacting directly with patients during check-in, preparation, and check-out

● Managing administrative tasks such as medical supply inventory, scheduling, and referrals

As you can see from the diverse tasks that can make up a Medical Assistant’s responsibilities, they are a significant part of a facility’s healthcare team. It’s understandable that as the healthcare industry expands rapidly, there is demand for Medical Assistants.

Start Working Towards Your Future Healthcare Career Now

If you want to start Medical Assisting training right away, then you’ve come to the right place! As global events have created dramatic shifts in many of our world’s most basic systems, it’s not surprising that education looks quite different these days. However, that doesn’t mean that you have to put your professional goals on hold.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we believe that there’s never been a more important time for future Medical Assistants to begin their training and education. With many campuses being closed for health and safety purposes, our students were faced with a dilemma: how could they get the skills and training needed to become a Medical Assistant? Working diligently to find a solution, The Allen School of Health Sciences created a blended program for our Medical Assistant students. You can take part of our program online and complete your clinicals in a classroom safe environment. As a Medical Assistant, your daily role will be one that centers around helping others, and you will have an important role in the health and safety of our society as a whole. As technology introduces many ways for education to step into the future, healthcare career training is more easily accessible than ever.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Get the Healthcare Skills and Training Today to Protect Our Future

Get the Skills and Training Today with Online Classes to Protect Our Future

Today more than ever, it is abundantly clear that healthcare professionals stand on the front lines when it comes to keeping our world healthy, safe, and happy. In light of recent world events, much of society has gained a new appreciation for healthcare workers, along with a heightened understanding of how much these highly trained professionals contribute to our daily lives.Whether you’ve long dreamed of a job in the medical field or have found yourself only recently inspired to pursue a healthcare career, the odds are that you’re well aware of the positive impact you can have on your future professional role. In fact, for countless healthcare workers, the promise of making a difference initially attracts them to the industry. Both personally and professionally fulfilling, working as a healthcare professional can certainly change your life for the better.If you’re hoping to work toward a healthcare career that you’re proud of, a career as a medical assistant may be the path you’ve been hoping to find. And now, thanks to a significant increase in workforce demand, it’s become easier than ever to find options for a healthcare education that suits your unique needs,  including excellent online programs. Here’s everything you need to know about how to get the training needed to become a medical assistant, and why this career path is the right one for you.

Medical Assistants: A Force for Good in the Growing Field of Healthcare

Have you ever considered a career as a medical assistant? You may be familiar with the job title, but not quite sure about what the role actually entails.As a multi-skilled healthcare professional, a medical assistant takes on a wide range of responsibilities in the healthcare setting. Working under the direct supervision of a licensed healthcare provider, such as a physician, medical assistants can work in private and public medical offices, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and other medical facilities. Depending on experience, education, and interests, a medical assistant may opt to work in a specialty field such as internal medicine, pediatrics, dermatology, cardiology, or urology.Roles and responsibilities of a medical assistant can include:
  • Taking vital signs
  • Assisting with examinations and various procedures
  • Drawing blood and collecting other lab samples
  • Updating patient records
  • Interacting directly with patients during check-in, preparation, and check-out
  • Managing administrative tasks such as medical supply inventory, scheduling, and referrals
As you can see from the diverse tasks that can make up a medical assistant’s responsibilities, they are a significant part of a facility’s healthcare team. It’s understandable that as the healthcare industry expands rapidly, there is notable demand for medical assistants – which means that a wealth of opportunities awaits.

Begin Medical Assistant Training Today

As global events have created dramatic shifts in many of our world’s most basic systems, it’s not surprising that education looks quite different these days. However, that doesn’t mean that you have to put your professional goals on hold.At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we believe that there’s never been a more important time for future medical assistants to begin their training and education. In fact, healthcare workers are experiencing a record level of workforce demand. However, with many campuses being closed for health and safety purposes, our students were faced with a dilemma: how could they get the skills and training needed to become a medical assistant?Working diligently to find a solution, we created an online medical assistant training program that features a selection of courses you can take entirely from home. Regardless of current world affairs or your personal situation and schedule, you can enroll in online medical assistant classes and continue moving toward your career dreams.

Medical Assistant Classes Online from the Allen School of Health Sciences

In creating our online medical assistant program, the Allen School team wanted to be certain that students were still receiving an education that would properly prepare them for a future in the field. Although an online classroom may look quite different from a traditional one, our staff has implemented a number of special measures to deliver an engaging, effective, and educational curriculum.Here are just a few of the ways our medical assistant online courses stand out:

Easy Accessibility with an Interactive, Instructor-Led Classroom Experience.

Instead of simply handing you a digital outline, your instructor will be actively leading the classroom experience. Your learning will be fully interactive, providing you with the opportunity to ask questions in real-time and engage in discussions that support your learning.

Useful Materials to Guide Your Training and Skill-Building

Much like an in-classroom experience, our online courses will include educational materials (such as instructor-created presentations, notes, and more) to help you effectively learn and study.

Passionate, Experienced Instructors

The instructors that lead our medical assisting training programs in New York and Arizona have always been dedicated to teaching and inspiring the future leaders of the healthcare industry. As the demand for trained medical assistants’ skyrockets, the Allen School teachers have become more committed than ever. When you enroll in our online medical assistant classes, you can be confident that your instructors will be enthusiastic about your future success.

Start Working Towards Your Future Healthcare Career Now

As technology introduces a myriad of ways for education to step into the future, healthcare career training is more easily accessible than ever. The Allen School of Health Sciences is thrilled to announce a selection of online classes for our medical assistant training program so that you can pursue your education from the comfort of your own home. For more than half a century, we’ve been a top choice for students working towards a career in the field of healthcare, and now, we’re proud to continue to offer training in an exciting new way.For more information about our medical assistant training programs in Arizona and New York, as well as details about our online courses, please contact the Allen School of Health Sciences today.  

A Few Ways Adult Medical Assisting Students Can Prepare for Graduation

A Few Ways Adult Medical Assisting Students Can Prepare for Graduation

If you’re an adult student who is about to graduate from a medical assistant or healthcare program, you must be so excited! We’re thrilled to share this moment with you. Even though you’ve been waiting for this moment for years, there are some things you should do before you walk virtually or physically across the stage and put your last classes behind you.

Here are some ways you can prepare for your upcoming graduation:

Make sure you’re good to go. If you haven’t already, connect with your academic department to be sure that you are in fact graduating. You’ve probably already received confirmation, but it’s always good to check. Due to the pandemic, many graduations will be conducted virtually. Treat your graduation like you are physically walking across that stage. Start planning what you’re going to wear the day of graduation. Graduation is the completion of your journey and the start of a new one. So, CELEBRATE!!

Work hard until the end. With your graduation day in sight, it can be easy to lose focus and want to rush the last couple weeks of class, but it’s important to keep up your hard work and finish strong. You might have a couple of clinicals left or are finishing up an internship but remember, your final grades will depend on how well you finish. You can do it!

Send thank you cards, e-cards or handwritten notes. Without encouragement and support of those along the way, you might not have made it. Write thank you notes to anyone who supported you, including your significant other, family members, friends, and even your instructors.

Ask for letters of recommendation. You wouldn’t be earning a Medical Assistant certificate if you didn’t want a successful outcome. Letters of recommendation from your instructors and professional contacts can help ensure you land a great job after you receive your diploma. Future employers will be impressed by well-written, honest, and positive recommendations! The Allen School of Health Sciences career services department is here to help.

Acknowledge your hard work and celebrate. Earning your certificate in Medical Assisting isn’t easy. You put a lot of time and energy into it, so be proud! Look back at everything you’ve done to accomplish this and get excited for the future ahead.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Your graduation awaits!! Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.