Social Media and Your Career

Social Media and your career
It is  rare to find anyone out there today who is not active on some sort of social media. We post, share, tweet, and comment on everything from what was for dinner last night to major events going on in the world. It can be easy to forget sometimes that what gets posted on the internet can play a big part in your future career in the healthcare field. Pictures – This is an easy one. It may be tempting to post that great selfie in your new bikini. Or snapchat the epic tower of cans from your last party with the guys, but think before you post. While your friends may give you a hundred thumbs up, your future employer may give you a great big thumbs down.  As a general rule if you wouldn’t show the picture to your mother, or better yet your grandmother, it is probably best left off your social media.Jokes and Memes – Most employers are going to overlook the occasional off color joke, but take a look at your posts as a whole. Is there a theme or trend that may make them take a closer look? If you’re trying to get a job as a Medical Assistant and all of your memes are about how doctors treat their co-workers for example, this could be enough to get you over looked for a position.Language and Drama – Obviously crude language is going to throw up a red flag to a potential employer, as is major drama that is shared in such a public setting, but employers also look at how well you write in general. If you cannot spell or use proper grammar, you may not be the candidate they want notating their patient records or working their billing and coding accounts.LinkedIn – Do you have one? Do you use it properly? Your account should be completely filled out and have an appropriate picture. Also consider joining groups on LinkedIn that interest you, they aren’t all business related. An active user on LinkedIn who contributes posts to groups presents a more professional appearance to employers.Security Settings – They are there to be used. It is usually wise to not share every single bit of your account with the entire world. Create friend groups for more personal posts (like the pictures mentioned above) and only post publically if there’s absolutely no question in your mind that the post won’t raise any questions to an employer. Wishing grandma a happy birthday makes a great public post, that bikini selfie mentioned above…. Not so much.Make Sure Your Story Matches – If you claim on LinkedIn that you’re employed full time at a great company and work really hard, don’t post on Facebook at 10am that you have just gotten a high score in Candy Crush. Either you are not employed where you say you are, or you are playing Candy Crush at work. An employer is going to give both these possibilities serious consideration as they are looking for job candidates.Have Social Media Accounts – Strange as it sounds your social media presence now makes up a big part of employers researching potential candidates. If you don’t exist at all on Social Media it can raise just as many questions as it does when you overshare. If social media just isn’t your thing, at the minimum make sure to establish a LinkedIn account that you update a few times a year.For better or worse social media is a major part of our society, and it does have an impact on both securing and keeping a job. The Career Services department at the Allen School of Health Sciences is here to help you gain every advantage you can as you start on the path to your new career in healthcare. If you are ready to be part of the Allen School Family give us a call today at 877-591-8753 or visit our website at www.allenschool.edu. #allenschoolsuccess

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