Medical Assistant Interviewing Tips

Are you preparing for a job interview for a Medical Assistant position? Familiarizing yourself with these common interview questions will help you have answers ready and feel more comfortable. When attending the Allen School of health Sciences, our Career Services team will assist you using these questions to give you a practice interview.

Tell me a little about yourself.

This is a basic interview question that can be tough to answer due to its open-ended nature. Instead of sharing hobbies or personality traits, keep your answer focused on your professional experience and education. Example:

I recently completed my Medical Assistant program at the Allen School of Health Sciences, where I learned to work with patients while taking their vital signs, and assisted doctors in physical exams and procedures. I especially enjoy communicating with patients and helping to make their experience easy and comfortable.

How much experience do you have as a Medical Assistant?

If you have prior experience as a Medical Assistant, tell them where you’ve worked, and how long you worked there. If you are new to the Medical Assistant field, tell them about your experience with the Allen School and your 275 clinical hours in your internship; Which is part of the Allen School of Health Sciences medical assistant program. Example:

I recently completed a 275-hour internship at City Medical where I obtained valuable hands-on experience in the responsibilities of a Medical Assistant. Now that I have graduated and completed my internship, I am looking forward to finding a full-time position and continuing my professional growth.

What are some of your strengths?

When answering this question, it’s important not to brag. Simply discuss the areas that you feel you are strongest in. Example:

My phlebotomy skills are one of my biggest strengths. I feel confident when drawing blood. I am also good as communicating with patients and making them feel comfortable.

What are some of your weaknesses?

When answering this question, do not put yourself down or say you are bad at something. Simply mention areas where you are looking to improve. Example:

I am currently more comfortable with clinical tasks than administrative responsibilities, but I am good at communicating, so I am confident that I can adapt to that role quickly.

Tell me about your computer skills.

When answering this question, be sure to mention your medical billing and coding training, as well as your electronic health records training at the Allen School, as both are very important when employers are looking to hire candidates Example:

I am trained in Electronic Health Records software, specifically the Example program. I have trained in medical billing and coding, and have learned how to process claims. I am also experienced with all Microsoft Office programs.”

Are you experienced in front office administrative responsibilities? Are you comfortable on the phone?

It is common for Medical Assistant to do a combination of clinical tasks and administrative work. Be ready to talk about the office tasks you have been trained to do. This is another good opportunity to bring up your EHR and medical billing and coding training. Example:

“We learned many front office duties in my training program at the Allen School of Health Sciences with an emphasis on customer service and professionalism. I have been trained on medical billing and coding and Electronic Health Records, and I am comfortable talking to patients both on the phone and in person.”

Have you been trained in phlebotomy? Are you comfortable drawing blood?

Phlebotomy is an important part of a Medical Assistant’s job, so employers will want to make sure you are trained and ready to take on that responsibility, even if you have not had any experience in the field yet. Example:

“I am comfortable with drawing blood and all phlebotomy procedures, and did well in my training at the Allen School of Health Sciences. I have had a lot of practice drawing blood from fellow students, family, and friends as a core component of my training, and continued receiving experience throughout my internship.”

Are you experienced in taking patient vital signs and medical histories?

These are important responsibilities for a Medical Assistant, so be sure to detail the procedures you learned in your training program. Example:

“I have been trained in taking weight, temperature, blood pressure, and pulse. We practiced in the lab at school, and I had the opportunity to take these measurements on patients during my internship.”

Why do you want to work here?

It’s important to research a company before you interview with them. If this question comes up, have a specific answer about what you can bring to the company. Avoid talking about personal motivations such as the good pay or easy commute. Example:

“Example Hospital’s pediatrics department would be a good fit for me because I enjoy working with children. Working with six different doctors would give me a great range of experience.”

Why are you the best candidate for this position?

When answering this question, you do not want to come off conceited. Simply reiterate your training and experience, and that you feel you would make a valuable member of the team. Example:

“I feel that my training, internship experience, and communication skills make me a strong candidate for this position. I am confident in all of the responsibilities in the job descriptions, and my personal skills will allow me to make patients comfortable during their visit.”

Think you might have what it takes, but afraid to ask? Take part in one of our virtual career planning sessions and discover the many healthcare pathways available to you. Contact the Allen School today! We are enrolling now for our classes starting soon and cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

-Allen School


Becoming a Medial Assistant During the COVID-19 Crisis

Becoming a Medial Assistant During the COVID-19 Crisis

Medical Assistants (MA’s) are some of the hardest-working professionals in the healthcare field. They have both clinical and administrative duties, which means one minute they might be scheduling appointments and answering phones, and the next, they’re rushing to take a patient’s vital signs. Being a Medical Assistant means stepping up to fill gaps, solve problems, direct patients and keep clinics and medical units running smoothly.

This career isn’t for everyone, but there are great benefits for those who do find this career appealing. We identified some of the top advantages below.

The Path to Becoming A Medical Assistant Is Relatively Short

You know you need a college or technical school education but you’re also itching to launch your career as soon as possible. While some healthcare-related degree programs take several years, earning Medical Assisting credentials is considerably shorter. The Allen School of Health Sciences medical assistant program can be completed in less than a year; In a blended format that combines traditional and online learning classes.

You Can Work in A Variety of Locations

Some healthcare jobs are limited to hospitals, but that’s not the case for MAs. As an MA you may find yourself working in a hospital, clinic, as part of a general practice or even in a surgery clinic. Medical Assistants can also find employment at nursing homes, assisted living facilities and many other settings.

You’ll Get to Build Relationships with Patients

Since Medical Assistants’ direct patients through their appointments, bringing them where they need to go, taking their vitals and asking screening questions, they have a chance to engage in conversation that can turn meaningful. A simple question like “How was your day?” can help patients relax and connect. Medical Assistants work face to face with people all day, making interpersonal skills very important in this career. If you have a passion for helping people, Medical Assisting is a great choice!

You’ll Be Part of a Team

Some careers can feel isolated—like you are doing the work all by yourself. This is definitely not the case if you become a medical assistant. MA’s are an important member of the healthcare team and frequently work alongside physicians, nurses, physician assistants or nurse practitioners. This means not only will you be able to ask questions and consult with your colleagues, but they’ll likely rely on you, too.

You’ll Acquire Necessary Skills for Advancement

Medical assistants need a handful of soft skills to complement their technical skills. Sympathy and good communication skills are near the top of the list. These transferable skills can be leveraged in many healthcare careers, so honing them as a Medical Assistant can help you advance down the road.

The technical skills of a Medical Assistant can lead to other opportunities as well. Learning how to draw blood or perform EKGs can translate to a variety of other healthcare professions. Clinics are constantly in need of people to take on leadership roles, whether it’s as a team lead or, with further education, as a clinic administrator.

You’ll Never Be Bored

Being a medical assistant means you probably won’t spend time sitting around waiting for your next task. That wide variety of skills we mentioned makes Medical Assistants very useful as “pinch hitters” when the clinic gets busy.

You Can Be A Specialist or A Generalist

While an MA’s duties can span several responsibilities, they don’t always have to. Those who prefer dabbling in several different areas would fit in well in a smaller clinic. You’ll gain a broad knowledge of the medical field due to the number of tasks you’ll undertake in all parts of the facility. If you prefer focusing on a few specific tasks, you may opt to work in a larger clinic with a bigger staff. This setting will allow you to specialize in a particular department that interests you, honing the precise skills needed for that position.

You’ll Start Gaining Experience Before You Graduate

Every medical assistant program is different, but some require students to complete an externship or internship while earning their certificate. For example, students enrolled in the Allen School of Health Sciences Medical Assistant program complete a clinical externship before they graduate into the real thing. The clinical experience makes a great addition to your resume and job search as well, since you can demonstrate to employers that you have hands-on experience.

Make A Difference as A Medical Assistant

Are you considering becoming a Medical Assistant (MA)? Not only is this an honorable decision that can allow you to make a positive difference in the lives of countless patients, but it’s also one that can lead you to an extremely fulfilling career. As a medical assistant, your daily role will be one that centers around helping others, and you will have an important role in the health and safety of our society as a whole.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assisting: A Career to go Places!

Medical Assisting: A Career to go Places!

Most people who want to work in the healthcare field likely aspire to be doctors or nurses, however medical assistants are one of the fastest-growing occupations in the United States. The Medical Assistant career path offers many of the same benefits as other healthcare professions, in addition to perks of its own.

The American Association of Medical Assistants describes a medical assistant as someone who works alongside doctors, usually in a clinical or office setting. Though the description may seem similar to that of a nurse, there are some key differences. Medical assistants commonly handle tasks such as showing patients to their rooms, checking vital signs, checking insurance information, handling medical records…. A licensed practical nurse, on the other hand, provides basic care measures like catheterization and prescription administration. While Medical Assistants often work in clinics and ambulatory care, licensed practical nurses more commonly work in settings like nursing homes and hospitals.

Starting Work Sooner

Medical assistants can begin working in the healthcare field sooner than students who attend nursing programs at four-year universities. At the Allen School of Health Sciences our accelerated program allows you to graduate in less than a year.

There is no additional waiting to complete residency because externships can be completed at the same time as the coursework. The Allen School of Health Sciences prepares students with an externship as part of the program. Having an externship as part of your Medical Assisting program can help bolster a Medical Assistant’s job prospects.

MA’s graduate with the knowledge and experience needed to excel in the healthcare industry. They are trained in both clinical and administrative tasks that are critical to running an office or clinic. With a vast array of skills at their disposal, Medical Assistants can explore different areas of medicine and discover what they are passionate about. They have the opportunity to specialize in a certain type of medicine, teach students who also want to be medical assistants or even become the office manager.

Diverse On-The-Job Experiences

Medical assistants are capable of performing many different tasks needed to keep the clinic or office open in addition to treating patients. Their versatility also ensures they will not be bored on the job because there is always something they can do.

Additionally, the patients who come in to be treated and what they are seeking to be treated for varies daily. Every day on the job is different than the one before.

Helping People

Medical assistants help physicians run their offices, but they also provide patients with compassion and understanding while doing so. Like their fellow healthcare professionals, Medical assistants take satisfaction in knowing they are helping patients and changing their lives for the better.

Will it be easy? Nope. Worth it? Absolutely?

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Interesting Facts about Medical Assistants.

Interesting Facts about Medical Assistants.

Ask yourself what you imagine a Medical Assistant does. You will be surprised how many people get it wrong! If you expect schooling for Medical Assisting to prepare you for changing bed pans or carrying out menial administrative tasks, your impression of this role doesn’t go deep enough.  The clinical medical assistant is a true chameleon of the healthcare industry. As a group, medical assistants demonstrate a range of talents that involves clinical as well as administrative tasks.

Medical Assistants Wear Many Hats.

Medical Assistant education requirements do not mention the need to be adaptable, but this is an important asset. Medical assistants wear many hats; they may be required to discuss medical records with a doctor one moment, then draw blood from a nervous patient the next moment. There are two languages used for each of these encounters: academic and emotional. A medical assistant knows that it’s just as important to care for a patient while blood samples are being taken as it is to be responsible for medical records and files. Busy and varied, this is an enthusiastic role that requires flexibility and commitment. Medical assistants have these qualities in spades.

Medical Assistants Play a Vital Role on Their Team.

A doctor needs an MA like a hamburger needs fries. Medical assistant classes prepare students for being one of the first faces a patient might see when arriving at a hospital or physician’s office.  The Medical assistant is responsible for checking the patient’s vital signs and preparing them for what happens next. Equally, a doctor is reliant on the information provided by the Medical assistant. The MA’s assistance in preparing the patient or clinic is essential for the doctor to be able to start work. In other occupations, you’ll see company directors who rely on their personal assistants to help make or break a deal, or professional athletes who count on their trainers to help them stay in the best shape possible. These types of professional duos take joint credit for their success stories. For healthcare professionals, the outcome can be life or death. Within the hospital or clinic, both roles are crucial for delivering seamless healthcare to patients.

They Have Hidden Talents Online and Off.

Medical assistants certainly don’t need to be computer geniuses, but there is no shortage of opportunities to utilize their tech skills. Now that patient records are electronic, healthcare workers are constantly brushing up on their IT knowledge as they go about their everyday work. MA jobs use computers for all kinds of routine tasks such as scheduling appointments, bookkeeping, or dealing with insurance companies. Use of technology means records are more accurate and the person using it saves a heap of time. In the past, manual entry of patient records was laborious and would slow down the process. Today with the use of electronic medical records, the process is much more streamlined. Some Medical assistants relish the use of technology to make work processes faster or more efficient, while others only use computerized systems and tools as required. Much of this kind of training can happen on the job. Using digital equipment becomes another part of the day-to-day activity, like complying with security measures or health and safety regulations. Becoming a Medical assistant can mean being as much a part of a digital world as it does to deliver face-to-face, practical and hands-on assistance.

Medical Assistants Are Everywhere!

Medical assistant programs prepare you for the role, but the job itself can be based anywhere, at any specialty. This is one of the most attractive features of working as an MA; working in hospitals, doctor’s offices, healthcare centers… Throughout the course of a career, it’s possible to try out different settings to find out which is the most enjoyable or challenging for you. Being able to move around easily can help with relocation issues or other practical considerations as well. Working in a large or busy hospital will offer a very different experience from working in a small family practice. For instance, in a hospital, the staff will interact with many different people at all level and from various walks of life. Working closely with the same group of people at a small doctor’s office lets you get to know your colleagues and patients better. Which setting is more appropriate will depend on the individual. Medical assistant courses, internships and networking along the way will help to provide a taste of what each place might have in store, but freedom to choose is a powerful motivator for job seekers.

Medical Assistants Have Options.

As a medical assistant, you may reach a fork in the road. Often, you can take the opportunity to specialize in areas you are passionate about; This may be a lifelong passion, or a growing interest discovered interning or in classes. When certified medical assistant training is over, however, you may be inspired by a colleague, an establishment, or general advancements in healthcare. If you still don’t feel you’ve found your niche, as an MA you can specialize in several different areas. Those who enjoy interaction with patients can move into patient care. For some individuals, clinical duties are more inspiring than clerical duties, but others may prefer keeping medical records or managing billing information.  For more hands-on assistants who are fascinated by drawing blood and visiting the lab, phlebotomy is a common choice.

They Set Their Own Schedule

Medical assistant schools’ welcome students from all backgrounds which makes this a popular career choice. You will be amazed at how diverse the range of motivations are that lead students to train for this career. Some students might be working towards a medical assistant certificate while juggling full-time work, family or other study. A young adult may have wanted to work in healthcare for as long as they can remember, and this becomes the first step in that process. A recent high school graduate could be training alongside a seasoned office worker who wants a completely new career.  The beauty of the Allen School of Health Sciences is our blended program of online and classroom learning. Our programs run both during the daytime and during the evening to accommodate every situation.

How Long Is Medical Assistant Training?

Medical assistant training does not take as long as you might think. The Allen School’s accelerated program will take less than a year to complete. Anyone in a Medical Assistant training program is working towards their dream job, so you know these students are determined to get that job.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assistant: Is it a Good Career Choice for you?

Medical Assistant: Is it a Good Career Choice for you?

Are you thinking about attending the Allen School of Health Sciences? One of the popular programs at many career schools is the Medical Assistant program. If you are considering this career, you might want to ask, is Medical Assistant a good career choice for you? Here are some of the topics you might want to think about.

What qualities make a good Medical Assistant?

This career field is all about working with patients, and serving as a link between patients, nurses, and doctors. Compassion, patience, and the desire to help others are all good personality traits if you are considering this career. It is also important to have good attention to detail, strong communications skills, and up-to-date computer skills.

Is Medical Assistant a good career choice for today’s job market?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook, (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm) Employment of Medical Assistants is projected to grow 23 percent from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations. The average for other occupations listed in the handbook is 11%. The handbook attributes this projected growth to a few trends:

  • • The growth of the aging baby-boomer population will increase the demand for more medical services.
  • • Primary care is a steadily growing sector of the healthcare industry, and primary care is where most Medical Assistants work.

What do Medical Assistants do?

If you are going to picture yourself in a new career, it helps to know what kinds of tasks you would be expected to do. Medical Assistants typically help with both administrative tasks and clinical tasks within doctor’s offices and other healthcare facilities. The duties vary, depending on the job, but some of the tasks might include: taking a patient’s history; measuring vital signs such as blood pressure, temperature, and weight; giving injections; preparing specimens for laboratory testing; and schedule appointments.

What are the working conditions like for Medical Assistants?

Most people in this field work in medical offices or other healthcare settings. The work environment is typically professional, well-lit, and clean. Most Medical Assistants wear scrubs to work, and most spend much of the day on their feet.

The hours can vary. Most positions are full-time and hours can sometimes include evening and weekends. Some Medical Assistants work shifts if they work in medical facilities that are open 24 hours a day, such as hospitals.

What kind of training or education is necessary?

Training requirements vary, depending on the employer. Many Medical Assistants have completed programs at a postsecondary institution such as the Allen School of Health Sciences. At the Allen School, our accelerated training program to become a Medical Assistant can be accomplished in less than a year. In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assisting at the Allen School of Health Sciences; A Career That’s Going Places!

Medical Assisting at the Allen School of Health Sciences; A Career That’s Going Places!

Most people who want to work in the healthcare field likely aspire to be doctors or nurses. However, Medical Assistant is one of the fastest-growing occupations in the United States. The Medical Assistant career path offers many of the same benefits as other healthcare professions, in addition to perks of its own.

The American Association of Medical Assistants describes a Medical Assistant as someone who works alongside doctors, usually in a clinical or office setting (https://www.aama-ntl.org/medical-assisting/what-is-a-medical-assistant). Though the description may seem similar to that of a nurse, there are some key differences. Medical Assistants commonly handle tasks such as checking vital signs, showing patients to their rooms and various administrative duties. A licensed practical nurse, on the other hand, provides basic care measures like catheterization and prescription administration. While Medical Assistants often work in clinics and ambulatory care, licensed practical nurses more commonly work in settings like nursing homes and hospitals.

Start Work Sooner

Medical Assistants can begin working in the healthcare field sooner than students who attend nursing programs at four-year universities. At the Allen School of Health Sciences our accelerated program allows you to graduate in less than a year.

There is no additional waiting to complete residency because externships can be completed at the same time as the coursework. The Allen School of Health Sciences prepares students with an externship as part of their program. Having an externship as part of your medical assisting program can help bolster a Medical Assistant’s job prospects.

Medical Assistants graduate with the knowledge and experience needed to excel in the healthcare industry. They are trained in both clinical and administrative tasks that are critical to running an office or clinic.

With a vast array of skills at their disposal, Medical Assistants can explore different areas of medicine and discover what they are passionate about. Medical Assistants have the opportunity to specialize in a certain type of medicine, teach students who also want to be Medical Assistants or even become the office manager.

Diverse On-The-Job Experiences

Medical Assistants are capable of performing many different tasks needed to keep the clinic or office open in addition to treating patients. Their versatility also ensures they will not be bored on the job because there is always something they can do.

Additionally, the patients who come in to be treated and what they are seeking to be treated for varies daily. Every day on the job is different than the one before.

Helping People

Medical Assistants help physicians run their offices, but they also provide patients with compassion and understanding while doing so. Like their fellow healthcare professionals, Medical Assistants take satisfaction in knowing they are helping patients and changing their lives for the better.

Will it be easy? Nope. Worth it? Absolutely? The Allen School of Health Sciences offers the essential resources medical assisting students need to excel in the classroom, in their externships, and in the workforce to help care for patients. In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more. -Allen School


Tips on Working From Home

Tips on Working From Home

In the office, your coworkers often pose the greatest threat to keeping you from getting some real, heads-down work done. They drop by your desk, engage you in conversation, and invite you to lunch. The social benefits of a workplace are definitely nice to have, but they can become a challenge if you’re easily distracted. At the home office, however, it’s easy for you to become your own worst enemy. When you’re not surrounded by coworkers, you’re free to drop those pesky inhibitions. At the home office, no one’s watching. You don’t necessarily feel that same peer pressure or communal obligation to get stuff done. (Also: You can wear shorts and a tee-shirt)!

Get Started Early: When working in an office, your morning commute can help you wake up and feel ready to work by the time you get to your desk. At home, however, the transition from your pillow to your computer can be much more jarring.

Believe it or not, one way to work from home productively is to dive into your to-do list as soon as you wake up. Simply getting a project started first thing in the morning can be the key to making progress on it gradually throughout the day. Otherwise, you’ll prolong breakfast and let the morning sluggishness wear away your motivation.

Choose a Dedicated Workspace: Just because you’re not working at an office doesn’t mean you can’t, have an office. Rather than locking yourself up in your room or on the couch, dedicate a specific room or surface in your home to work.

Structure Your Day Like You Would in the Office: When working from home, you’re your own personal manager. Without things like an in-person meeting schedule to break up your day, you can be quick to lose focus or burn out. To stay on schedule, segment what you’ll do and when over the course of the day. If you have an online calendar, create personal events and reminders that tell you when to shift gears and start on new tasks.

Plan Out What You Will Be Working on Ahead of Time: Spending time figuring out what you’ll do today, can take away from actually doing those things; you’ll have planned your task list so recently that you can be tempted to change your schedule on the fly. It’s important to let your agenda change if you need it to, but it’s equally as important to commit to an agenda that outlines every assignment before you begin. Try solidifying your schedule the day before, making it feel more official when you wake up the next day to get started on it.

Communicate Expectations with Anyone Who Will Be Home with You: Of course, you might be working from home but still have “company.” Make sure any roommates, siblings, parents, and spouses respect your space during work hours. Just because you’re working from home doesn’t mean your home.

AND SOME FUN…….

Match Your Music to The Task at Hand; During the week, music is the soundtrack to your career. And at work, the best playlists are diverse playlists — you can listen to music that matches the energy of the project you’re working on. It only makes sense that it would help you focus on your work as well. To be shown on our Instagram page (@allen_school), tag us in your work-from-home TikTok videos! #allenschoolstrong.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Handwashing- Not Just For Kids

Handwashing- Not Just For Kids

“Did you wash your hands?” Handwashing- the number one thing we remind kids to do. But as we’ve seen in recent days, it’s so important for everyone to remind themselves to wash; not just kids! Handwashing with soap and water is one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to loved ones. Many diseases are spread by not cleaning your hands properly after touching contaminated objects or surfaces. Although not all germs are bad, illness can occur when harmful germs enter our bodies through the eyes, nose, and mouth. That’s why it is critical to wash hands at key times, such during flu season and especially now during a pandemic; when germs can be passed from person to person and make others sick.

Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of germs on them, however during a disaster, clean running water may not be available. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

Here are three key reasons why you should always care about handwashing:

  • • Handwashing can keep children healthy and in school. Handwashing education can reduce the number of young children who get sick and help prevent school absenteeism.
  • • Handwashing can help prevent illness. Getting a yearly flu vaccine is the most important action you can take to protect yourself from flu. Besides getting a flu vaccine, CDC recommends everyday preventive actions including frequent handwashing with soap and water.
  • • Handwashing is easy! Effective handwashing is a practical skill that you can easily learn, teach to others, and practice every day to prepare for an emergency. It takes around 20 seconds, and can be done in five simple steps:
    • o Wet your hands with clean, running water, turn off the tap, and apply soap
    • o Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap
    • o Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice
    • o Rinse your hands well under clean, running water
    • o Dry your hands using a clean towel or air-dry them

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.  -Allen School


Medical Assisting – A day in the life

Medical Assisting – A day in the life

Medical Assisting is not just a job – it’s a highly rewarding profession with a diverse array of roles and responsibilities. A day in the life of a Medical Assistant is difficult to pinpoint because your day to day activities may vary depending on what type of practice you work for and the department you work in. No matter where you work, however, there is one thread that ties together all of your responsibilities and duties: the need for attention to detail, professionalism and caring. If you work primarily at the front desk, you’ll be responsible for answering the office’s phone system and asking medical questions to determine the severity of the caller’s problem. You are also tasked with informing the physician about patient concerns, scheduling appointments and greeting patients as they enter the office. Medical Assistants should demonstrate professionalism and tact when interacting with patients and follow protocol for determining a patient’s immediate needs.

Attention to detail is also extremely important in the front office. In addition to your reception duties, you will also need to obtain patients’ insurance information, collect insurance co-payments, verify patients’ addresses and phone numbers, update and maintain HIPAA authorizations and call insurance companies for pre-authorization and pre-certification approval for testing or surgeries. Mistakes can be costly – for both the practice and the patient, so it’s critical that you are thorough and meticulous in completing these tasks.

If you work in the back office, you’ll have an even greater opportunity to interact with patients and may even assist the physician in treating the patient. On a typical day, you could help measure patients’ vital signs, such as blood pressure, pulse, respirations, and height and weight. You would also be responsible for obtaining the patient’s medical history and determining the patient’s chief complaint (the reason why he or she is in the office) so that you can brief the physician.

Other duties might include performing visual acuity testing, ear irrigations, hearing tests, and setting up the exam room for a procedure. Sometimes you might be able to assist the physician with minor surgical procedures, such as inserting or removing sutures. Medical Assistants play an important role in making a patient feel comfortable during an appointment. Often, they can help reduce a patient’s anxiety about an upcoming procedure by relaying information from the physician in terms that the patient can understand. It’s important to have a good bedside manner and a calm demeanor when dealing directly with patients. Finally, some Medical Assistants might be responsible for performing in-house laboratory procedures. These procedures include drawing blood, urinalysis, throat cultures, pregnancy tests, drug screens, EKGs and much more. Attention to detail is important here as well because an error could cause a misdiagnosis.

Regardless of their role, Medical Assistants serve an essential function on the healthcare team. From the front office to the lab, they contribute to the success of the physician and the practice and ensure that patients have a good experience during their visit.  If you want to start a career as a Medical Assistant or learn about a career in health care, contact The Allen School today!

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


SINGLE PARENTS RETURNING TO SCHOOL

SINGLE PARENTS RETURNING TO SCHOOL

We’re really impressed when we hear about single parents returning to school on top of everything else, they’re doing! Getting an education isn’t just important for you, it’s crucial for your kids, too. It was not easy, but this is the goal of many single parents.  We often hear from single parents in college who are:

  • • Working full-time and going to school during the day or at night
  • • Completing intensive internships on top of their jobs
  • • Returning to school as ‘older’ students to earn or finish their program.

Congratulations to all of you! We know how frantic everyday life can get; working and parenting can be overwhelming. We also know that returning to school is one of the best ways to gain new skills and move ahead. If you’re a single parent in school or consider returning to school, here are our tips for success:

Write Down Your Goals

Make your goals specific. For example, “I will have taken all my required courses by fall of 2020. I will do this by taking an accelerated program with an internship before the end of the year.” “I will attend every optional study session offered, even if it is scheduled on a Friday afternoon.” Make a contract with yourself and sign your name. Promise yourself to move ahead with a well thought out plan.

Get Organized

Do not think you can just plop your school stuff down on the kitchen table every night. Find a shelf, box, or file cabinet in which to keep your school materials. The kitchen table can certainly turn into your ‘school desk’ at night, but you need a defined, organized place to keep everything. Otherwise, valuable study time is wasted on looking for misplaced things, or items the children somehow managed to ‘borrow.’

Don’t Procrastinate

Single moms or dads in school do not have the option to procrastinate. Guaranteed, the first time you put off an important school paper, a child will become ill, and you’ll need to take care of them, thus won’t be able to turn in your paper on time. The best way to manage the inevitable stresses of juggling multiple responsibilities as a single parent in school is to prioritize and NOT procrastinate. When your assignments are completed, you can enjoy guilt-free time away from the pressures of school.

Learn to say ‘No’

When returning to school, you must learn to say no to demands that do not help you either 1) progress in your studies, or 2) personally benefit you and your children. Lots of us have trouble saying no. If this is difficult for you then try keeping a tangible reminder, like a picture of a vacation spot you’d like to visit.  This will remind you that once you complete your program you will have the opportunity for a better life with increased income, and career advancement.

Now, we’d love to know:

If you want to start a career as a medical assistant or learn about a career in health care, Contact the Allen School today! In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

-ALLEN SCHOOL