Medical Assisting at the Allen School of Health Sciences; A Career That’s Going Places!

Medical Assisting at the Allen School of Health Sciences; A Career That’s Going Places!

Most people who want to work in the healthcare field likely aspire to be doctors or nurses. However, Medical Assistant is one of the fastest-growing occupations in the United States. The Medical Assistant career path offers many of the same benefits as other healthcare professions, in addition to perks of its own.

The American Association of Medical Assistants describes a Medical Assistant as someone who works alongside doctors, usually in a clinical or office setting (https://www.aama-ntl.org/medical-assisting/what-is-a-medical-assistant). Though the description may seem similar to that of a nurse, there are some key differences. Medical Assistants commonly handle tasks such as checking vital signs, showing patients to their rooms and various administrative duties. A licensed practical nurse, on the other hand, provides basic care measures like catheterization and prescription administration. While Medical Assistants often work in clinics and ambulatory care, licensed practical nurses more commonly work in settings like nursing homes and hospitals.

Start Work Sooner

Medical Assistants can begin working in the healthcare field sooner than students who attend nursing programs at four-year universities. At the Allen School of Health Sciences our accelerated program allows you to graduate in less than a year.

There is no additional waiting to complete residency because externships can be completed at the same time as the coursework. The Allen School of Health Sciences prepares students with an externship as part of their program. Having an externship as part of your medical assisting program can help bolster a Medical Assistant’s job prospects.

Medical Assistants graduate with the knowledge and experience needed to excel in the healthcare industry. They are trained in both clinical and administrative tasks that are critical to running an office or clinic.

With a vast array of skills at their disposal, Medical Assistants can explore different areas of medicine and discover what they are passionate about. Medical Assistants have the opportunity to specialize in a certain type of medicine, teach students who also want to be Medical Assistants or even become the office manager.

Diverse On-The-Job Experiences

Medical Assistants are capable of performing many different tasks needed to keep the clinic or office open in addition to treating patients. Their versatility also ensures they will not be bored on the job because there is always something they can do.

Additionally, the patients who come in to be treated and what they are seeking to be treated for varies daily. Every day on the job is different than the one before.

Helping People

Medical Assistants help physicians run their offices, but they also provide patients with compassion and understanding while doing so. Like their fellow healthcare professionals, Medical Assistants take satisfaction in knowing they are helping patients and changing their lives for the better.

Will it be easy? Nope. Worth it? Absolutely? The Allen School of Health Sciences offers the essential resources medical assisting students need to excel in the classroom, in their externships, and in the workforce to help care for patients. In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more. -Allen School


Tips on Working From Home

Tips on Working From Home

In the office, your coworkers often pose the greatest threat to keeping you from getting some real, heads-down work done. They drop by your desk, engage you in conversation, and invite you to lunch. The social benefits of a workplace are definitely nice to have, but they can become a challenge if you’re easily distracted. At the home office, however, it’s easy for you to become your own worst enemy. When you’re not surrounded by coworkers, you’re free to drop those pesky inhibitions. At the home office, no one’s watching. You don’t necessarily feel that same peer pressure or communal obligation to get stuff done. (Also: You can wear shorts and a tee-shirt)!

Get Started Early: When working in an office, your morning commute can help you wake up and feel ready to work by the time you get to your desk. At home, however, the transition from your pillow to your computer can be much more jarring.

Believe it or not, one way to work from home productively is to dive into your to-do list as soon as you wake up. Simply getting a project started first thing in the morning can be the key to making progress on it gradually throughout the day. Otherwise, you’ll prolong breakfast and let the morning sluggishness wear away your motivation.

Choose a Dedicated Workspace: Just because you’re not working at an office doesn’t mean you can’t, have an office. Rather than locking yourself up in your room or on the couch, dedicate a specific room or surface in your home to work.

Structure Your Day Like You Would in the Office: When working from home, you’re your own personal manager. Without things like an in-person meeting schedule to break up your day, you can be quick to lose focus or burn out. To stay on schedule, segment what you’ll do and when over the course of the day. If you have an online calendar, create personal events and reminders that tell you when to shift gears and start on new tasks.

Plan Out What You Will Be Working on Ahead of Time: Spending time figuring out what you’ll do today, can take away from actually doing those things; you’ll have planned your task list so recently that you can be tempted to change your schedule on the fly. It’s important to let your agenda change if you need it to, but it’s equally as important to commit to an agenda that outlines every assignment before you begin. Try solidifying your schedule the day before, making it feel more official when you wake up the next day to get started on it.

Communicate Expectations with Anyone Who Will Be Home with You: Of course, you might be working from home but still have “company.” Make sure any roommates, siblings, parents, and spouses respect your space during work hours. Just because you’re working from home doesn’t mean your home.

AND SOME FUN…….

Match Your Music to The Task at Hand; During the week, music is the soundtrack to your career. And at work, the best playlists are diverse playlists — you can listen to music that matches the energy of the project you’re working on. It only makes sense that it would help you focus on your work as well. To be shown on our Instagram page (@allen_school), tag us in your work-from-home TikTok videos! #allenschoolstrong.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Handwashing- Not Just For Kids

Handwashing- Not Just For Kids

“Did you wash your hands?” Handwashing- the number one thing we remind kids to do. But as we’ve seen in recent days, it’s so important for everyone to remind themselves to wash; not just kids! Handwashing with soap and water is one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to loved ones. Many diseases are spread by not cleaning your hands properly after touching contaminated objects or surfaces. Although not all germs are bad, illness can occur when harmful germs enter our bodies through the eyes, nose, and mouth. That’s why it is critical to wash hands at key times, such during flu season and especially now during a pandemic; when germs can be passed from person to person and make others sick.

Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of germs on them, however during a disaster, clean running water may not be available. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

Here are three key reasons why you should always care about handwashing:

  • • Handwashing can keep children healthy and in school. Handwashing education can reduce the number of young children who get sick and help prevent school absenteeism.
  • • Handwashing can help prevent illness. Getting a yearly flu vaccine is the most important action you can take to protect yourself from flu. Besides getting a flu vaccine, CDC recommends everyday preventive actions including frequent handwashing with soap and water.
  • • Handwashing is easy! Effective handwashing is a practical skill that you can easily learn, teach to others, and practice every day to prepare for an emergency. It takes around 20 seconds, and can be done in five simple steps:
    • o Wet your hands with clean, running water, turn off the tap, and apply soap
    • o Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap
    • o Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice
    • o Rinse your hands well under clean, running water
    • o Dry your hands using a clean towel or air-dry them

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.  -Allen School


Medical Assisting – A day in the life

Medical Assisting – A day in the life

Medical Assisting is not just a job – it’s a highly rewarding profession with a diverse array of roles and responsibilities. A day in the life of a Medical Assistant is difficult to pinpoint because your day to day activities may vary depending on what type of practice you work for and the department you work in. No matter where you work, however, there is one thread that ties together all of your responsibilities and duties: the need for attention to detail, professionalism and caring. If you work primarily at the front desk, you’ll be responsible for answering the office’s phone system and asking medical questions to determine the severity of the caller’s problem. You are also tasked with informing the physician about patient concerns, scheduling appointments and greeting patients as they enter the office. Medical Assistants should demonstrate professionalism and tact when interacting with patients and follow protocol for determining a patient’s immediate needs.

Attention to detail is also extremely important in the front office. In addition to your reception duties, you will also need to obtain patients’ insurance information, collect insurance co-payments, verify patients’ addresses and phone numbers, update and maintain HIPAA authorizations and call insurance companies for pre-authorization and pre-certification approval for testing or surgeries. Mistakes can be costly – for both the practice and the patient, so it’s critical that you are thorough and meticulous in completing these tasks.

If you work in the back office, you’ll have an even greater opportunity to interact with patients and may even assist the physician in treating the patient. On a typical day, you could help measure patients’ vital signs, such as blood pressure, pulse, respirations, and height and weight. You would also be responsible for obtaining the patient’s medical history and determining the patient’s chief complaint (the reason why he or she is in the office) so that you can brief the physician.

Other duties might include performing visual acuity testing, ear irrigations, hearing tests, and setting up the exam room for a procedure. Sometimes you might be able to assist the physician with minor surgical procedures, such as inserting or removing sutures. Medical Assistants play an important role in making a patient feel comfortable during an appointment. Often, they can help reduce a patient’s anxiety about an upcoming procedure by relaying information from the physician in terms that the patient can understand. It’s important to have a good bedside manner and a calm demeanor when dealing directly with patients. Finally, some Medical Assistants might be responsible for performing in-house laboratory procedures. These procedures include drawing blood, urinalysis, throat cultures, pregnancy tests, drug screens, EKGs and much more. Attention to detail is important here as well because an error could cause a misdiagnosis.

Regardless of their role, Medical Assistants serve an essential function on the healthcare team. From the front office to the lab, they contribute to the success of the physician and the practice and ensure that patients have a good experience during their visit.  If you want to start a career as a Medical Assistant or learn about a career in health care, contact The Allen School today!

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


SINGLE PARENTS RETURNING TO SCHOOL

SINGLE PARENTS RETURNING TO SCHOOL

We’re really impressed when we hear about single parents returning to school on top of everything else, they’re doing! Getting an education isn’t just important for you, it’s crucial for your kids, too. It was not easy, but this is the goal of many single parents.  We often hear from single parents in college who are:

  • • Working full-time and going to school during the day or at night
  • • Completing intensive internships on top of their jobs
  • • Returning to school as ‘older’ students to earn or finish their program.

Congratulations to all of you! We know how frantic everyday life can get; working and parenting can be overwhelming. We also know that returning to school is one of the best ways to gain new skills and move ahead. If you’re a single parent in school or consider returning to school, here are our tips for success:

Write Down Your Goals

Make your goals specific. For example, “I will have taken all my required courses by fall of 2020. I will do this by taking an accelerated program with an internship before the end of the year.” “I will attend every optional study session offered, even if it is scheduled on a Friday afternoon.” Make a contract with yourself and sign your name. Promise yourself to move ahead with a well thought out plan.

Get Organized

Do not think you can just plop your school stuff down on the kitchen table every night. Find a shelf, box, or file cabinet in which to keep your school materials. The kitchen table can certainly turn into your ‘school desk’ at night, but you need a defined, organized place to keep everything. Otherwise, valuable study time is wasted on looking for misplaced things, or items the children somehow managed to ‘borrow.’

Don’t Procrastinate

Single moms or dads in school do not have the option to procrastinate. Guaranteed, the first time you put off an important school paper, a child will become ill, and you’ll need to take care of them, thus won’t be able to turn in your paper on time. The best way to manage the inevitable stresses of juggling multiple responsibilities as a single parent in school is to prioritize and NOT procrastinate. When your assignments are completed, you can enjoy guilt-free time away from the pressures of school.

Learn to say ‘No’

When returning to school, you must learn to say no to demands that do not help you either 1) progress in your studies, or 2) personally benefit you and your children. Lots of us have trouble saying no. If this is difficult for you then try keeping a tangible reminder, like a picture of a vacation spot you’d like to visit.  This will remind you that once you complete your program you will have the opportunity for a better life with increased income, and career advancement.

Now, we’d love to know:

If you want to start a career as a medical assistant or learn about a career in health care, Contact the Allen School today! In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

-ALLEN SCHOOL


Tips for a successful Medical Assistant externship

Tips for a successful Medical Assistant externship

Externships are temporary training programs in a workplace, which provide important experience and hands on learning. The Medical Assistant externship is extremely important for getting you career ready. As a Medical Assistant extern, you are expected to carry out the duties that you were taught in your training program, but you’ll also learn some new tricks of the trade! The capability to execute your learning potential is certainly important, however you need to show you’re a team player and open to learning new things. It’s very important to utilize proper interpersonal skills, maintain a professional look and exhibit a superior attitude at your externship site for rewarding success. Here are some more tips for success on your Externship:

  1. 1. Concentrate on your appearance

Dress professionally. You should wear professional work attire when interviewing for your Externship. Once assigned a site, all Medical Assistants are expected to maintain a clean, tidy and professional look.

  1. 2. Understand the rules and guiding principles

When you step into a medical facility as an extern, remember that you are considered a ‘visitor’ at that facility. You will be expected to follow their policies, so it is always better to read and understand the workplace policy manual thoroughly for the first few days of your training. Make sure to take notes and consider your externship as a hands-on job interview.

  1. 3. Be reliable and punctual

A Medical Assistant externship provides you with a great opportunity to establish your reliability, loyalty and competencies as a medical professional. Promptness and timeliness are the best indicators that establish your dependability. As an extern, you should always be enthusiastic and prepared to help out with front office duties. At times you will be expected to answer the phone, do some administrative tasks and assist the medical team so being on time affects not only you but your team as well.

  1. 4. Follow instructions carefully

During the first few days of your externship, you will be treated in the same way as a new employee. You will be provided with some simple duties in the first few days. This is to make an assessment of your ability to follow straightforward directions and perform proficiently. Your day to day responsibilities, tasks and duties will soon increase both in significance and meaning as the externship program moves forward.

  1. 5. Resolve issues in a professional approach

If you come across a difficult situation at your externship site, contact your school’s Career Service Advisors. As a student, you should learn the appropriate ways to deal with all administrators and managers and try hard to resolve each and every single issue professionally. Always remember your Career Service team is there to guide you toward a successful externship.

  1. 6. Maintain confidentiality

Medical records are private and are never to be discussed with anyone besides the patient and their medical team. Not only is it ethical, but it is the law.

  1. 7. Don’t forget to convey your thanks

It’s always a good idea to send a ‘Thank you’ note to your site, for giving you an opportunity to accomplish your externship at their medical facility; this will create a good impression.

To learn more about our health care programs and externships, contact the Allen School today! At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future graduates.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assisting: Turning challenges into rewards

You dreamed of a Medical Assistant career where your life’s work would be all about helping others. You wanted to contribute your knowledge and compassion to a healthcare team that helps patients get well, but the profession has its challenges. So how do you turn those challenges into rewards and accomplishments you can be proud of? How can you do the job you love? Follow these steps:

  1. Accept diversity Not all your patients, or even all the people you work with, are going to think just like you. If you understand that fact from the get-go, you won’t look at differences as a bad thing. Instead, you’ll come to appreciate diversity and enjoy getting to know others. Learn about their cultures and ideas—and share yours. Isn’t it awesome that you get to meet so many different people as a Medical Assistant?
  2. Empower your patients No one enjoys being hurt or sick. All they want to do is get better. And as a Medical Assistant, you get to help them! Share what you’ve learned through your healthcare training at the Allen School of health Sciences and experiences you have learned working in the healthcare field, and you’ll give your patients some of the tools they need to get well. For example, you probably understand the importance of following a physician’s instructions to the T. You can explain the doctor’s instructions and turn medical terminology into a language your patients can understand. All that info helps your patients take charge of their own care. The more they do what they’re supposed to, the sooner they’ll be on the mend.
  3. Advocate for your patients How can doctors possibly help patients if they don’t have all the details of what’s going on? Since you might spend more time with patients than even their doctors, you could have vital information that will improve their treatment. Encourage your patients to be completely open and honest about how they feel and tell their doctor. But when they don’t, it’s your job to make certain the healthcare staff knows what they need to make good decisions for the best patient care. Communication can be a challenge in any setting, but your patients rely on you to have their best interest at heart. And their good health and sincere appreciation is a great reward.
  4. Acknowledge your own limitations It’s frustrating to deal with difficult patients. It’s hard when you really can’t make someone better and when you don’t have all the answers. But you’re not supposed to! It’s important to remember what you can—and can’t—do as a Medical Assistant. Focus on the positive. You can offer kindness and comfort. A smile and a pleasant attitude can go a long way to turn grumpy patients into happy people. But when your positive disposition doesn’t work, don’t let it get you down.

The best reward about being a Medical Assistant is to know that you can make a difference in someone’s day, in their healthcare, and maybe even their life. If you’re up for a challenge because you really want to do something that matters, maybe a career as a Medical Assistant is right for you.

Interested in learning more about developing the skills and attributes of a Medical Assistant? Ready to start a Medical Assistant Program? At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assistant: Tips for a Virtual Interview

The global pandemic has up-ended upended how we connect and how we work. Working from home has become a new normal for now but may have lasting repercussions on how healthcare providers view the necessity of an office, in-person appointments or patient care. A video interview may well become the new norm. Nailing a video interview is likely to become another requirement for successful job seekers in the medical field. Here are some tips:

Acknowledge the situation:  We’re all adjusting to a weird new normal, working from our homes with family members and pets nearby. Of course, your interviewer would much rather meet you in person in their office environment but here’s the bright side, your video interview can be an opportunity to connect a little more authentically, with grace and good humor. No doubt your interviewer’s business has been radically affected by the global pandemic. Express your appreciation for the interview taking place, despite the chaos unfolding all around.

Practice using technology: Make the time to have a video call with a tech-savvy friend (or teen in your world) ahead of time on the platform that you’ll be using (Zoom, GoToMeeting, Skype, FaceTime, etc.). If you are unfamiliar with the technology, fumbling with it 15 minutes before the video call is a rookie move. Select a place to have the video call where you’ll be uninterrupted.

Figure out the lighting and a background that appears professional. Be sure that your computer audio is working. Make sure that if you have to accept a connection ahead of time (as with Skype) that you’ve done so and your user name sounds professional. Make sure your technology is charged up and that your Wi-Fi signal is strong. If all else fails, ensure you have the phone number of your interviewer on hand so that your interview can continue even if the video technology fails.

Dress and act the part: Dress as you would for an in-person meeting. You’ll want to appear professional, serious and ready to get to work, even if from your basement. Dressing up beyond your normal work from home sweatpants and a tee shirt will also shift your mindset to a more professional one as well as help you stay focused during the interview. Remember to maintain eye contact, no quick movements and pause your communication to allow for transmission delays.

Make a friend first:  As with any interview, you’ll want to be friendly, relatable and establish rapport at the outset. Your goal is to come across as a potential colleague. Be yourself but look for common points of connection (mutual friends, experiences, academic background, interests).

Have answers to important questions: Every Medical Assistant candidate should be prepared with solid answers to the following:

  • Tell me about the experience you have as a Medical Assistant. Internship work counts.  (It’s good to know how much experience candidates have as a Medical Assistant).
  • Why are you right for the role?  What do you uniquely bring in terms of experience, leadership and personal attributes that make you a good fit for the company?
  • Do you have experience handling front office obligations? Are you comfortable answering phones and greeting patients? Medical Assistants are often tasked with doing a mix of administrative and clinical work.
  • What phlebotomy training have you had if any? Drawing blood is part of the Medical Assistant’s job. (Be ready to talk about your phlebotomy training, comfort with taking blood and your ability to take patients’ vitals).

Follow up, even if they don’t. After your interview is over, send a warm thank you email within 24 hours. Express your enthusiasm for the company and the role and make sure to reference something from your conversation. If you are interviewing with multiple people, make each email different (yes, colleagues compare thank you emails).

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future medical assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Back to School as a Working Adult

A growing number of career and vocational training schools now offer programs oriented toward working adults. People frequently enroll in career schools to acquire new skills for a new career. Accelerated programs and flexible schedules are making it easier and more convenient for working adults to finish school. Enrolling in a career school is a great way to make a career transition, learn new skills, study subjects of personal interest, and enhance marketability in a competitive job market. Unfortunately, many would-be students who desire a career change or wish to return to school, never wind up doing so due to fear.

The First Step is Admitting It

The following concerns and fears are shared by many working adults reluctant to return to school:

  • The cost of returning to school
  • The time commitment involved
  • The challenges of attending classes with younger students

Many are also concerned that their employers will be unimpressed with their new career. However, most working adults enrolling in career school, end up fitting in well and are more than up to the challenge of returning to school as an adult. They usually enroll with fear and concern, only to later realize that their fear and concern were unfounded.

I’m Afraid It Will Be Too Expensive

It can be expensive returning to school. The expense alone is enough to cause many working adults to reconsider their decision to return to school. However, when education is viewed as an investment, the cost of attending school does not seem as large of a sacrifice. It’s best to have a long term rather than short term perspective. Salary increases associated with obtaining more education often offset the cost of returning to school. Many schools are relatively inexpensive to attend. Before deciding against returning to school based on the cost, consider how this advanced training will help you in your current or new career.

I’m Afraid It Will Take Up Too Much Time

It’s not unreasonable for adult students to feel overwhelmed with their current responsibilities. As a result, returning to school can be that much more intimidating. Working full-time, raising a family, and fulfilling other responsibilities are enough to occupy already full schedules.

It is possible, however, to make time for returning to school; and many adults do it quite successfully. It may require sacrificing some leisurely activities, but it is possible to make the time. If you set a goal and have an unwavering commitment to reach it, you can develop the ability to make sacrifices that will allow you to accomplish your educational objectives.

I’m Afraid It Will Take Forever to Complete My Program

The Allen School of Health Sciences offers accelerated learning programs. As a result, these programs require less time than would be required if one pursued their degree the traditional way.  Educational quality is not sacrificed to speed through course material. Most students graduate their program in less than a year.

Why Make the Move?

Since many career schools cater exclusively to working students, there are few, if any, reasons why an adult should hesitate to return to school if they feel it makes sense. They can greatly benefit from the decision to further their education. The following are just a few of the many benefits of returning to school as an adult:

  • Promotion or career advancement opportunities: Returning to school is one way to improve your chances to get promoted, or it is one strategy for beginning a career transition.
  • Finish a started program: Many students find opportunities in the workforce before completing school. However, it is never too late to return and start a new career.
  • Demonstrate to your children and future generations the importance of education: If you set an example for your children, they are more than likely to attend school and enjoy the benefits a career can offer.

It may seem intimidating and daunting to enroll in school, but this should not be a reason for missing out on the benefits of acquiring more education. Adults who simply put together a good, workable plan can smoothly make the transition back to school and make the experience a great success.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future graduates.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

-Allen School


Medical Assistant Externship

Medical Assistant Externship

You can learn a lot in the classroom, but you can’t learn everything, especially if you’re studying to be a Medical Assistant. This is a career that requires a lot of medical knowledge, as well as skills and professional attributes that can only be gained through hands-on experience. At the Allen School of Health Sciences, and in most Medical Assistant programs, that comes in the form of an externship: 275 hours in a healthcare facility. We want to prepare our students for all aspects of the work, and to help them prepare so we’ve written an outline of what to expect from your Medical Assistant externship.

Working under supervision

One of the greatest benefits of a Medical Assistant externship is the opportunity it provides to practice skills and duties while being supervised. In your classes, you’ll learn what and why Medical Assistants do what they do. However, the moment you take that knowledge into the real world with real patients, even the simplest things like taking blood pressure can be daunting. The good news is: You’re not alone.

Your supervisor will work with you closely, especially at the beginning, to ensure you remember everything you’ve learned in class. They will ensure you feel comfortable administering your duties. In addition to your guide, of sorts, your supervisor may also serve as your safety net to ensure you don’t miss anything. That aspect of supervision can and should relieve a lot of pressure. It’s common to feel nervous before you’ve gained your skills, practice, and habits, but a supervisor’s presence should relieve most of those fears.

You’ll also be able to observe your supervisor and coworkers perform procedures you’ll eventually perform yourself. It’s one thing to read about Medical Assisting in a textbook and quite another to witness in a working environment.

Asking a thousand questions

Your Medical Assistant externship should be a time to unleash your curiosity. These 275 clinical hours are trying, but they also provide an opportunity to learn all aspects of a job from the people who are doing it. In class, you’ll learn about best practices and why different medical procedures are done a certain way. In your externship, you can ask the less technical questions such as “how do you help nervous patients calm down?” and “why do we put away the files like this?”. Asking questions that interest you will make all aspects of the work more personal and will help the answers stick.

Learning the role

A big part of the job is all about communication. The authority with which you carry yourself, and the empathy you bring to patient interactions can’t be taught in a lecture. They’re skills, critical to the position, that you can only learn in your Medical Assistant externship. As you practice and observe the professionals around you, you’ll understand the interpersonal aspects of the work. When you begin your externship, you’ll feel like a student. Ideally, by the time you leave, you can expect to feel like you fit the role.

Gaining Confidence

As a result, you can expect at the end of your externship to feel confident in your abilities to be a Medical Assistant. Self-confidence is a huge part of any healthcare job, which can be challenging for students as it can’t be learned in a textbook or seminar. Gaining confidence in your ability to perform administrative and clinical duties requires practice, life experience, and supportive supervision. It requires, in other words, an externship where you won’t just learn how to be a Medical Assistant; you will become one.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in our future Medical Assistants. In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School