Helpful tips to become a better Medical Assistant

Helpful tips to become a better Medical Assistant

For students in a Medical Assistant program you may be busy learning about the clinical aspects of the job, such as how to draw blood, administer an injection, or take a patient’s vital signs. These are clearly a very important part of your training. But in addition, there are also “soft skills” that are important to your training. Learning to be a reliable employee is a skill that can use throughout your entire career. Try these tips for getting a strong start in your new career.

1. Be an early bird

Plan to arrive at work 10 to 15 minutes early every day. You will need this time to put your belongings away and get ready for your work day. This gives you time to review the list of patients who are scheduled and to check on the day’s supplies. It helps you avoid the feeling of having to “hit the ground running” the minute you step in the door. By arriving early, you can start off your work day feeling calm and organized.

2. Stay positive

Work is called “work” for a reason — it’s hard work! Each day there may be tasks that you don’t enjoy, changes that you weren’t expecting, or problems that arise, but rather than griping or complaining, take a positive approach. Remember that handling problems is simply part of the job. Try to focus on the parts of the job that you do enjoy rather than the negative aspects. With a positive attitude, you will find that you inspire the others around you.

3. Carry your own weight

As a Medical Assistant, you will be part of a healthcare team in a medical office or a hospital setting. Others on your team might include nurses, office staff, physicians, and other MA’s. Each of them is counting on you to do your job. If you shirk your responsibilities, someone else will have to pick up your slack. Make sure you take your responsibilities seriously and put forth your best effort to fulfill your duties. As a team member, you should also be proactive. If you see a need that isn’t being fulfilled, see where you can help. This kind of approach helps make you a valuable member of your team.

4. Be respectful to anyone and everyone

Medical offices and hospitals are busy places. In the course of serving patients throughout the day, healthcare professionals can get stressed and hurried. Despite this, try to stay polite and respectful to everyone throughout the day. Showing respect to others will result in receiving their respect in return. This includes everyone you work with, from the newest employees to the head honchos. And most of all, it includes patients—even those who may test your patience. Being a respectful person is a career skill that should stay with you for your entire career.

5. Keep up your education

In a field like Medical Assisting, you need to be sure that you keep up with your learning. New technologies and medications are being created, and you want to be sure to stay on the cutting edge. Be sure to attend continuing education classes. Join a professional association and read their newsletters and blog articles regularly. Having up-to-date knowledge of your career field is something that you can be proud of and something that others will respect.

Following these tips is a way to “go the extra mile” as a Medical Assistant. If you follow these guidelines, you can improve your approach to your work. What’s more, the better you perform on the job, the better you will feel about your career.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering the necessary positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in future Medical Assistants.  In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Tips to Help You Navigate Going Back to School to Become a Medical Assistant

Tips to Help You Navigate Going Back to School to Become a Medical Assistant

If you want to make a difference and help others, a career in healthcare could be the right path for you. Going back to school is never an easy decision, however, even if a healthcare career has always been your calling, there are a lot of factors to consider. Finding the right program will get you the help you need during your time in school, striking a balance between work, school and your personal life. Here are a few tips to help you navigate through your decision to go back to school.

1. Find a program that works for you

It’s important to find a school and program that can meet your individual needs as a student. Flexible schedules and online course offerings can make it easier for you to earn your certification while working or raising your family. Choosing a blended program can give you the best of both worlds. Interactive online experience provides both at home learning and hands on classroom training. If going to school with kids and a fulltime job seems impossible, fear not because there are options! Choosing a blended program will help you balance your work and family life thereby allowing you to be successful in school.

2. Ask for help if you need it

Everyone needs a little help from time to time. Your instructors want to see you succeed, and they will be there for you whenever you need extra help or support. It’s important to put your best foot forward and talk about any challenges you are facing with faculty and staff. At the Allen School of Health Sciences communication is key. We are here to support you every step of the way. Let us guide you to the correct resources for your situation. We are in this together and your success is our success.

3. Take advantage of other academic resources

There are a variety of resources to support you in your learning and career development. Be proactive about getting the support you need – whether it’s contacting the Career Services department, meeting with your academic director, or setting up make up hours with your instructor, you will find all of the resources you need for success at the Allen School of Health Sciences.

4. Believe in yourself

Maybe you always knew you wanted to help others, and a career in healthcare seemed like the perfect fit. It won’t always be an easy journey, but don’t give up. For nearly sixty years, the Allen School of Health Sciences has trained thousands of people for their new careers in healthcare. Why not you?

5. Don’t lose sight of your goals

No matter what challenges you face along the way, keep your eye on the prize and continue working to achieve your goals.  Your dedication and hard work will all be worth it in the end. At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering the necessary positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in future Medical Assistants.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, the Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.


Traits of a Successful Medical Assistant 

Traits of a Successful Medical Assistant 

Be it in a large hospital or small family practice, Medical Assistants are a necessary part of any healthcare organization. MA’s are essential healthcare professionals performing both clinical and administrative tasks. On any given day, an MA can find themselves answering phones, taking electrocardiograms, scheduling appointments, dealing with bookkeeping, or explaining a treatment plan to a patient. The world they live in is diverse, demanding, and necessary. The following are some of the personality traits that make for successful Medical Assistants.

Positivity

Medical Assistants are often the face of healthcare. They greet patients, answer telephones, and talk people through what’s happening with a given procedure or test. It’s common for patients to feel anxious or worried during an examination or treatment, so a positive attitude from the healthcare worker changing their dressing or running a test can make all the difference in a patient’s morale.

If a MA feels good about their job and their environment, then the patient will feel better about being a patient. A smile, an understanding answer to a question, or a reassuring explanation of a test are essential to effective healthcare.

Empathy

Healthcare workers often encounter patients at moments of vulnerability. MA’s will occasionally find themselves in a position where they are the closest human being to someone in a moment of emotional crisis. When that happens, it’s necessary for an MA to maintain their composure and have an appropriate empathic response to the patient.

Being a healthcare worker is a technical job, but it’s also a deeply human and caring one. Empathy will be essential for any MA in any patient interaction, be it routine or not.

Professionalism

Both the clinical and administrative sides of healthcare depend on an MA. They take medical histories, conduct blood draws, EKA tests and blood pressure. Care and precision are important in every situation, and there is often little room for error. Dedication to accuracy and precision will serve an MA well in all avenues of their professional career, and, in turn, their accuracy and precision will better serve others.

Integrity

Integrity is one of the Allen School of Health Sciences core values, and for good reason. As we say in our statement of values, EDUCATE:

  • • Education Quality & Integrity
  • • Dedication
  • • Understanding of Others
  • • Communication & Consistency
  • • Advisement & Achievement
  • • Teamwork & Technology
  • • Excellence.

Doctors, nurses, hospital administrative staff and most importantly patients depend on the work that Medical Assistants do. When an MA medical begins a shift, they are not just clocking in at work, they are devoting themselves to a career of service to others. At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we are devoted to fostering the necessary positivity, empathy, professionalism, and integrity in future MA’s.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Get Medical Assistant Skills and Training Today with a Blended Format of Traditional and Online Classes.

Get Medical Assistant Skills and Training Today with a Blended Format of Traditional and Online Classes.

Today more than ever, it is abundantly clear that healthcare professionals stand on the front lines when it comes to keeping our world healthy, safe, and happy. In light of recent world events, much of society has gained a new appreciation for healthcare workers, along with a heightened understanding of how much these highly trained professionals contribute to our daily lives.

Whether you’ve long dreamed of a job in the medical field or have found yourself only recently inspired to pursue a healthcare career, the odds are that you’re well aware of the positive impact you can have on your future healthcare role.  If you’re hoping to work toward a healthcare career that you’re proud of, a career as a Medical Assistant may be the path you’ve been hoping to find.

Here’s everything you need to know about how to get the training needed to become a Medical Assistant, and why this career path is the right one for you. Have you ever considered a career as a Medical Assistant? You may be familiar with the job title, but not quite sure about what the role actually entails.

As a multi-skilled healthcare professional, a Medical Assistant takes on a wide range of responsibilities in the healthcare setting. Working under the direct supervision of a licensed healthcare provider, such as a physician, Medical Assistants can work in private and public medical offices, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and other medical facilities. Depending on experience, education, and interests, a Medical Assistant may opt to work in a specialty field such as internal medicine, pediatrics, dermatology, cardiology, or urology. Roles and responsibilities of a medical assistant can include:

● Taking vital signs

● Assisting with examinations and various procedures

● Drawing blood and collecting other lab samples

● Updating patient records

● Interacting directly with patients during check-in, preparation, and check-out

● Managing administrative tasks such as medical supply inventory, scheduling, and referrals

As you can see from the diverse tasks that can make up a Medical Assistant’s responsibilities, they are a significant part of a facility’s healthcare team. It’s understandable that as the healthcare industry expands rapidly, there is demand for Medical Assistants.

Start Working Towards Your Future Healthcare Career Now

If you want to start Medical Assisting training right away, then you’ve come to the right place! As global events have created dramatic shifts in many of our world’s most basic systems, it’s not surprising that education looks quite different these days. However, that doesn’t mean that you have to put your professional goals on hold.

At the Allen School of Health Sciences, we believe that there’s never been a more important time for future Medical Assistants to begin their training and education. With many campuses being closed for health and safety purposes, our students were faced with a dilemma: how could they get the skills and training needed to become a Medical Assistant? Working diligently to find a solution, The Allen School of Health Sciences created a blended program for our Medical Assistant students. You can take part of our program online and complete your clinicals in a classroom safe environment. As a Medical Assistant, your daily role will be one that centers around helping others, and you will have an important role in the health and safety of our society as a whole. As technology introduces many ways for education to step into the future, healthcare career training is more easily accessible than ever.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


A Few Ways Adult Medical Assisting Students Can Prepare for Graduation

A Few Ways Adult Medical Assisting Students Can Prepare for Graduation

If you’re an adult student who is about to graduate from a medical assistant or healthcare program, you must be so excited! We’re thrilled to share this moment with you. Even though you’ve been waiting for this moment for years, there are some things you should do before you walk virtually or physically across the stage and put your last classes behind you.

Here are some ways you can prepare for your upcoming graduation:

Make sure you’re good to go. If you haven’t already, connect with your academic department to be sure that you are in fact graduating. You’ve probably already received confirmation, but it’s always good to check. Due to the pandemic, many graduations will be conducted virtually. Treat your graduation like you are physically walking across that stage. Start planning what you’re going to wear the day of graduation. Graduation is the completion of your journey and the start of a new one. So, CELEBRATE!!

Work hard until the end. With your graduation day in sight, it can be easy to lose focus and want to rush the last couple weeks of class, but it’s important to keep up your hard work and finish strong. You might have a couple of clinicals left or are finishing up an internship but remember, your final grades will depend on how well you finish. You can do it!

Send thank you cards, e-cards or handwritten notes. Without encouragement and support of those along the way, you might not have made it. Write thank you notes to anyone who supported you, including your significant other, family members, friends, and even your instructors.

Ask for letters of recommendation. You wouldn’t be earning a Medical Assistant certificate if you didn’t want a successful outcome. Letters of recommendation from your instructors and professional contacts can help ensure you land a great job after you receive your diploma. Future employers will be impressed by well-written, honest, and positive recommendations! The Allen School of Health Sciences career services department is here to help.

Acknowledge your hard work and celebrate. Earning your certificate in Medical Assisting isn’t easy. You put a lot of time and energy into it, so be proud! Look back at everything you’ve done to accomplish this and get excited for the future ahead.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Your graduation awaits!! Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.


Benefits of becoming a Medial Assistant during the COVID-19 Crisis

 

Medical assistants (MA’s) are some of the hardest-working professionals in the healthcare field. They have both clinical and administrative duties, which means one minute they might be scheduling appointments and answering phones, and the next, they’re rushing to take a patient’s vital signs. Being a Medical Assistant means stepping up to fill gaps, solve problems, direct patients and keep clinics and medical units running smoothly.

This career isn’t for everyone, but there are some great benefits for those who find a career in medical assisting appealing. We identified some of the top advantages below.

The path to becoming a Medical Assistant is relatively short

You know you need a college or technical school education but you’re also itching to launch your career as soon as possible. While some healthcare-related degree programs take several years, earning a Medical Assisting credential is considerably shorter. The Allen School of Health Sciences medical assistant program can be completed in less than a year; In a blended format that combines traditional and online learning classes.

You can work in a variety of locations

Some healthcare jobs are limited to hospitals, but that’s not the case for MAs. As an MA you may find yourself working in a hospital, clinic, as part of a general practice or even in a surgery clinic. Medical Assistants can also find employment at nursing homes, assisted living facilities and many other settings.

You’ll get to build relationships with patients

Since Medical Assistants’ direct patients through their appointments, bringing them where they need to go, taking their vitals and asking screening questions, they have a chance to engage in conversation that can turn meaningful. A simple question like “How was your day?” can help patients relax and connect. Medical Assistants work face to face with people all day, making interpersonal skills very important in this career. If you have a passion for helping people, Medical Assisting is a great choice!

You’ll be part of a team

Some careers can feel isolated—like you are doing the work all by yourself. This is definitely not the case if you become a Medical Assistant. MAs are an important member of the healthcare team and frequently work alongside physicians, nurses, physician assistants or nurse practitioners. This means not only will you be able to ask questions and consult with your colleagues, but they’ll likely rely on you, too.

You’ll acquire necessary skills for advancement

Medical Assistants need a handful of soft skills to complement their technical skills. Sympathy and good communication skills are near the top of the list. These transferable skills can be leveraged in many healthcare careers, so honing them as a Medical Assistant can help you advance down the road.

The technical skills of a Medical Assistant can lead to other opportunities as well. Learning how to draw blood or perform EKGs can translate to a variety of other healthcare professions. Clinics are constantly in need of people to take on leadership roles, whether it’s as a team lead or, with further education, as a Clinic Administrator.

You’ll never be bored

Being a Medical Assistant means you probably won’t spend time sitting around waiting for your next task. That wide variety of skills we mentioned makes Medical Assistants very useful as “pinch hitters” when the clinic gets busy.

You can be a specialist or a generalist

While an MA’s duties can span several responsibilities, they don’t always have to. Those who prefer dabbling in several different areas would fit in well in a smaller clinic. You’ll gain a broad knowledge of the medical field due to the number of tasks you’ll undertake in all parts of the facility. If you prefer focusing on a few specific tasks, you may opt to work in a larger clinic with a bigger staff. This setting will allow you to specialize in a particular department that interests you, honing the precise skills needed for that position.

You’ll start gaining experience before you graduate

Every medical assistant program is different, but some require students to complete an externship or internship while earning their certificate. For example, students enrolled in the Allen School of Health Sciences Medical Assistant program complete a clinical externship before they graduate into the real thing. The clinical experience makes a great addition to your resume and job search as well, since you can demonstrate to employers that you have hands-on experience.

Make a difference as a Medical Assistant

Are you considering becoming a Medical Assistant (MA)? Not only is this an honorable decision that can allow you to make a positive difference in the lives of countless patients, but it’s also one that can lead you to an extremely fulfilling career. As a Medical Assistant, your daily role will be one that centers around helping others, and you will have an important role in the health and safety of our society as a whole.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Fun Things to do at Home During Quarantine

Fun Things to do at Home During Quarantine:

With everything closed from museums to concerts and sporting events as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, many Americans are faced with significant time spent at home and wondering how to pass that time. Since safety and social distancing is the main priority, we have listed a few fun things to do at home during quarantine.

Start spring cleaning and maintenance: What a better time than now to start those spring tasks around the house to get your home ready for warmer months. Take this time to organize that closet or room you’ve been putting off or get a head start on outdoor work in the flower beds.

Home Improvement Ideas: Have you been thinking about painting your kitchen? A new bathroom, perhaps? Use your downtown to put those ideas into an action plan. Research contractors, price out paints, finishes, etc. When things get back to normal, you will be ready to move forward with your home improvement ideas.

Take Walks: Getting out of the house and moving is so important to mental health and helps get some movement in. Go on walks around your neighborhood or on your public trails. Most public trails remain open for fitness, but please be conscious if you are using a public trail or path to adhere to social distancing guidelines.

Support your local business: Small business in your area need your help now more than ever. Many of these are in the hospitality and retail industries which are being hit the hardest. Check in with your favorite local restaurant to see if they are offering curbside pick-up.

Listen to Podcasts: TV binging is a given, but have you considered Podcasts? Play them while you are working from home, cooking, or doing work around the house. From comedy, to series, to news, it is a great way to keep your mind occupied during the day.

Adopt an animal: Animal Shelters across the country are facing a crisis as many have been forced to close. Consider using your downtime to help shelters ease the burden while they are closed and adopt an animal

Brush up on skills or start a new career: Use your newly found weekends to brush up on your current skills, or maybe start a new career! Free time is also great for learning a new skill that you have always wanted to learn but have pushed off because you just didn’t have the time. Starting a new career can be overwhelming. Especially if you have never taken an online class. Going from face to face classroom interaction to online classes can be a big adjustment for you. A supportive environment is key. That’s where the Allen School of Health Sciences come in; Helping Medical Assistant students transition to a new way of learning.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment in classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.


Tips for Online Medical Assistant Students

Tips for Online Medical Assistant Students

You find yourself sitting in the comfort of your home, your phone, tablet or laptop resting in front of you. You pull up your online class and are presented with tons of information. You ask yourself, “What am I going to do now”.

If you’ve never done online learning before, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the amount of information presented to you. While you may feel like you are “on your own”, the Allen School of Health Sciences provides consistent assistance and easy accessibility with a live classroom experience. Here are some tips to help you make the transition to online courses with ease.

Be Proactive

You may not be able to raise your hand to ask questions like you did when you were in a physical classroom, but in the online virtual classroom, you’ll still have a space to ask questions, as well as many resources to stay ahead of the game. Make sure you’re utilizing them.

  1. Take time to click through your online course. What helpful things are being offered? Online tutoring? Make up classes?
  2. Start making a list of all the resources offered to you to refer to later.
  3. If you have unanswered questions, reach out to the instructor.
  4. Develop a personal calendar based off the class deadlines so you can organize yourself effectively. You can use Google Calendar, Outlook, and more.
  5. Make sure you have a quiet, organized place to do your work.

Be Present

Your classroom life may now be behind a screen, but that doesn’t mean you can’t breathe life into every session you attend.

  1. Pay attention during the live lectures. At the Allen school of Health Sciences, all classes are taught in a live action classroom experience. In many other schools live classroom environments might be optional
  2. Be active on discussion boards: This is a great way to start networking with other classmates and stay connected. Introduce yourself if you haven’t already, bounce questions off each other to be supportive, and take note of any helpful tips from your professor.
  3. Set up your own virtual meet-up sessions with other students. You can do this through Zoom, or whichever virtual meeting platform your classroom uses. Try sending out an email to your class to see if you can get some of your peers together to discuss how things are going and to support each other along the way.

Be Purposeful

Being in a virtual classroom doesn’t mean you’re being let off easy! You must be accountable, and self-motivated to be successful in an online world.

  1. Minimize distractions: When you are setting yourself up for study time, make sure the TV is off, your phone is put away (preferably in another room), and tell your family that it’s your study time and not to interrupt you unless they need to.
  2. Schedule break times because it can be very easy to get distracted.
  3. Make it fun: Listen to some study music in the background as you tackle assignments (if it helps you focus), ask a friend or family member to quiz you on your notes to allow for some personal contact, and make sure you’re comfortable.
  4. Take your work seriously — you may not be in a physical classroom, but you should act as if you are when you begin every study session. It’s up to you to take responsibility for your work and to appreciate the knowledge being given to you!

While transitioning to an online format can be intimidating at first, you will have many resources to ensure your success. In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual career planning sessions for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu​ to learn more.

-Allen School


Strategies for Getting the Most Out of Online Classes 

Strategies for Getting the Most Out of Online Classes 

In the past, going to school meant physically attending in-person classes, which often posed challenges for working men and women or those with complicated schedules. Now, thanks to advances in technology, it’s easier than ever to find a healthcare program that offers the flexibility you need, whether through traditional in-person classes, online learning, or a blend of the two.

There are many advantages of going to school online. Taking an online program makes it easier to earn a certificate or degree while balancing work and family commitments.

Online classes can present unique challenges, however, if you’re not prepared. But if you develop skills for effective online learning, you’ll find the courses can be an excellent alternative to a traditional classroom setting. Here are some tips for online learning success to make sure you get the most value out of your next class.

Tips for Taking Online Classes 

If you’re considering taking an online program (or you’re already enrolled in a program) the tips and advice below can help you address their unique challenges to get the most value out of your program.

1. Treat an online course like a “real” thing.

When it comes to online classes, you need to have the discipline to sit down and say, “I am going to work on this,” as well as the dedication to actually follow through. One of the easiest ways to ensure follow through is to remember that you are paying to take this program. Just as you would for a traditional, in-person program, you must “show up” if you’re going to get real value out of your class. Treat your online classes the same way you would a face-to-face class—or, better yet, a job—and you’ll be off to the right start.

2. Hold yourself accountable

Set goals at the beginning of the module and check in with yourself weekly. If you’re having trouble holding yourself responsible, pair up with a fellow classmate, or enlist the help of a spouse or friend to check in as an accountability partner. By being organized, proactive, and self-aware, you can get the most from your online class even when life outside of school becomes chaotic.

3. Practice time management.

The flexibility to create your own schedule is often one of the biggest appeals of taking online classes. But that freedom can also be detrimental if you do not have solid time management skills. Without them, you might easily find yourself cramming before classes or handing in subpar assignments. Though how you manage your time will depend on your schedule, learning style, and personality. Look at the syllabus at the start of the module and make note of major assignments. Mark them on a calendar you check regularly so you know what workload is coming in the weeks ahead. Don’t forget to factor in prior commitments that may interfere with your regular study schedule, so you can give yourself enough extra time to complete assignments. When working on your assignments, try time-blocking, allotting yourself a certain amount of time for each task before moving on to the next one and setting a timer to keep you accountable.

4. Create a regular study space and stay organized.

Set up a dedicated learning environment for studying. By completing your work there repeatedly, you’ll begin to establish a routine. Whether your workspace is your kitchen table, a bedroom, or a living room coffee table it’s important to determine what type of environment will work best for you. Experiment to discover which type of setting boosts your productivity. Wherever you choose, make sure there’s high-speed internet access so you’re not trying to take an online program over a lagging connection. Setting up a regular workspace or office will also help you to stay organized. Knowing exactly where important dates, files, forms, syllabi, books, and assignments live will help keep you on track towards hitting your goals.

5. Eliminate distractions.

From Netflix to social media to dishes piling up in the sink, you’ll be faced with many distractions that can easily derail your studies. The best online students know how to lessen these distractions and set aside time to focus. Exactly how much of a challenge these distractions will prove to be will depend on your own unique personality and situation. Some might find that they can tune out a noisy home by listening to music. Others might choose to work from a bedroom with the door closed to eliminate their urge to multitask at home. Ultimately, you will need to find a strategy that works best for you. Regardless of where you choose to work, consider turning your cell phone off to avoid losing focus every time a text message or notification pops up.

6. Figure Out How You Learn Best

Once you’ve established where you’ll learn, think about when and how you accomplish your best work. If you’re a morning person, make time to study first thing. More of a night owl? Set aside an hour or two after dinner to cozy up to your computer. If the kids require your morning and evening attention, try to carve out a study session mid-day while they’re working on their school work. Brew your usual cup of coffee, put on your go-to playlist, and do whatever you need to get into the zone and down to business. Not everyone learns the same way, so think about what types of information help you best grasp new concepts and employ relevant study strategies. If you’re a visual learner, for example, print out transcripts of the video lectures to review. Learn best by listening? Make sure to build time into your schedule to play and replay all audio- and video-based course content.

7. Actively participate.

Participate in the course’s online forum to help you better understand course materials and engage with fellow classmates. This might involve commenting on a classmate’s paper on a discussion board or posting a question about a project you’re working on. Read what other students and your instructors are saying, and if you have a question, ask for clarification. And if you do feel yourself falling behind, speak up. Don’t wait until an assignment is almost due to ask questions or report issues. Email your professor and be proactive in asking for help.

Going from face to face classroom interaction to online classes can be a big adjustment for you. A supportive environment is key. That’s where the Allen School of Health Sciences comes in; Helping Medical Assistant students transition to a new way of learning.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment in classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

– Allen School


Medical Assistant Growth in 2020

Medical Assistant Growth in 2020

The healthcare industry has always been one of the fastest-growing in the world, demonstrating the ongoing need for trained professionals who are prepared to care for patients both healthy and sick. In the United States and around the world, 2020 is projected to be a year of unprecedented growth, as a variety of factors drive the sharply increasing need for a healthcare workforce.

The COVID-19 crisis, as well as several other issues, have created a perfect storm. Ultimately, it seems that the healthcare industry may be facing a serious shortage in 2020 – which is why the growth in workforce demand has increased at a rapid rate.

Medical Assistants are Needed Now More than Ever

The COVID-19 pandemic is just one of the numerous factors driving the growing demand for healthcare workers, with the industry as a whole expecting significant growth in the next several years. Although COVID-19 is a major force behind the need for medical assistants right now, there are several other elements that will continue to fuel demand in coming years, including:

● The aging population and an increase in chronic conditions in the United States, which will require a larger healthcare workforce than is currently available.

● A significant percentage of current healthcare workers are expected to retire, as the “Baby Boomer” generation reaches retirement age.

● Growing availability of new and advanced positions, leading professionals to seek opportunities outside their current positions.

For anyone considering a career as a Medical Assistant or another healthcare role, this means that employment prospects should be excellent in the years to come.

How COVID-19 Has Affected the Healthcare Workforce Demand

As the world experiences a widespread pandemic of historic scale and severity, the need for healthcare professionals have become more apparent than ever before. A newfound appreciation and respect for Medical Assistants and all healthcare workers have swept the nation (and the

globe), and a growing number of people understand how important trained professionals are to the health and safety of our society as a whole.

More Healthcare Workers are Needed Now

A significant shortage in healthcare workers has been one of the biggest challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, as medical facilities around the country realize that their staff simply can’t keep up with the demand for care. As patients are admitted and diagnosed at a steadily increasing rate, there are serious concerns about whether the current workforce will be able to keep up in the next several months. As a result, new healthcare professionals, including Medical Assistants, are discovering that jobs are plentiful. Many facilities are raising their hiring and employment rates, expanding their teams as quickly and effectively as possible to try to meet future needs.

Finally, additional measures are being taken to protect the health and safety of Medical Assistants, and other healthcare professionals. For many medical facilities, it has become very clear that without their healthcare team, quality and availability of patient care will drop – and so, protective protocols are being developed to help keep Medical Assistants, Nurses and other medical staff safe. For example, some facilities are offering their staff benefits such as private transportation to and from work, childcare, grocery deliveries, and sealed meals delivered to their place of employment.

Make a Difference as a Medical Assistant

Are you considering becoming a Medical Assistant (MA)? Not only is this an honorable decision that can allow you to make a positive difference in the lives of countless people, but it’s also one that can lead you to an extremely fulfilling career. As a Medical Assistant, your daily role will be one that centers around helping others, and you will have an important role in the health and safety of our society as a whole.

In order to protect our community during the COVID-19 crisis, The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact The Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.

-Allen School