Healthcare Training Schools Teach Compassion

CompassionUnless you’ve been living under a rock, you’re aware of the rising tensions between the law enforcement community and those they are sworn to protect and serve.  Several high profile cases have recently ripped open a divide between these two groups.  Wherever you stand on the issue, there is one thing that is true.  Violence is NEVER, EVER the answer.

Healthcare training schools like the Allen School, prepare men and women to enter a field where they are often confronted with the mal-effects of violence in our society.  Gun shot wounds, beatings, attacks and all manner of other violent activity sends men and women, cop and criminal alike to seek treatment.  It is the job of the healthcare worker to treat them all without judgment.  That said, it is troubling that in our home town of New York City, where several of the latest deadly encounters have taken place, we’re seeing a deep, divisive distrust growing among us.  Fanned by those on both sides with a political axe to grind, these activities hold the potential to spin wildly out of control.

In this holiday season where we turn to thoughts of peace and love for all mankind, the Allen School Blog would like to suggest that everyone assume the posture of a healthcare professional and take a compassionate stance on this very charged conflict.  It is important for us all to remember, all lives matter.   The vast majority of law enforcement are good people, dedicated to a very difficult job.  At the same time, most people living in poverty and other desperate situations aren’t criminals.  They are simply seeking a way to get by without resorting to criminal activity.

Painting all cops with a broad brush is no less damaging than painting all those living in poverty – whether  Black, Hispanic, poor White or other – as thugs and criminals.  Let’s all try this Holiday season, to turn away from hatred, division, recriminations and violence and look upon one another as worthy of love, respect and goodness – just the way healthcare professionals look at their patients.  The world will be a better place for it in 2015 if we can halt the cycle of violence.

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