The Best Places to Work as a Medical Assistant in 2022 (Part 2)

If you’re considering a career as a medical assistant, your professional future involves fulfilling an essential role in healthcare. Medical assistants have a broad range of responsibilities, helping contribute to the successful operation of a healthcare facility – and ensuring that doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals are able to treat and care for patients effectively. You can work as a medical assistant in many different settings, ranging from private practices to large hospitals and other facilities. It’s a position that is in high demand and one that will always be relevant to today’s healthcare systems.  Anytime you decide to pursue a certain career path, you want to be confident that you’re making the right choice for your future – and medical assisting is no different. So, you may have a number of questions about medical assistants, such as:
  • What are the best places to work as a medical assistant?
Here is part 2 of our handy guide with the best cities to find a job as a medical assistant. Refer to part 1 for the top 5 best cities to work as a medical assistant.

6. Chicago, Illinois

  • 16,590 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $38,190
  • Average hourly wage: $18.71
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $50,120
If you’re hoping to work as a medical assistant in a bustling metropolitan city, Chicago might just be the place for you. It’s the United States’ third most populous metro area, yet it has a far more affordable cost of living as opposed to other major cities. It’s consistently named one of the top urban areas for a high quality of life and is home to a diverse population of people from all over the world.    Medical assisting jobs in Chicago are plentiful and varied, especially because there are a number of premier medical centers in the city. On the Near West Side, you’ll find the Illinois Medical District. At the same time, the metro area also hosts two of the nation’s most respected academic medical centers (the University of Chicago Medical Center and Northwestern Memorial Hospital). Throughout Chicago and its suburbs, there is a multitude of physicians’ offices, specialists, residential care homes, and more – so you won’t be short on job opportunities. 

7. Atlanta, Georgia

  • 15,850 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $36,870
  • Average hourly wage: $17.73
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $47,960
Considering a move to the South? In Atlanta, GA, medical assisting jobs number well into the thousands. And as its population continues to grow steadily, the city will only need more skilled medical assistants to meet the increasing need.   Although Atlanta has plenty of that traditional Southern charm, it’s also a dynamic and modern cosmopolitan city. Rich in culture and big on fun, Atlanta offers some of the very best in dining, shopping, entertainment, sports, history, and outdoor adventures. Combined with an affordable cost of living, these perks make Atlanta a great place to kick off your career.

8. Phoenix, Arizona

  • 14,770 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $38,630
  • Average hourly wage: $18.57
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $44,500
Nicknamed the “Valley of the Sun,” the Phoenix metropolitan area shines with professional opportunities for prospective medical assistants. With famously sunny weather and a scenic desert setting, the metro area is made up of several communities, including Mesa and Scottsdale.    Many cities within the Phoenix metro area have earned mentions as the top places to live in the nation, drawing young professionals and families alike. You’ll be surrounded by mountains in this incredible valley and have more than enough options for shopping, dining, and recreation.    If you’re just beginning your journey toward becoming a medical assistant, Phoenix is a particularly great place to be. The Allen School has a Phoenix medical assisting school that offers an accredited training program for MA students. You’ll gain the knowledge and hands-on experience you need to land the job of your dreams, and you can do it all in the city where the sun never stops shining.    Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Phoenix metropolitan area includes Mesa and Scottsdale, AZ. 

9. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • 14,909 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $39,450
  • Average hourly wage: $18.97
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $47,990
Philadelphia may be one of the most historic cities in the United States, but it has a decidedly modern attitude. The metro area has a population of well over 6 million, so it makes sense that there are many medical assistant jobs in Philadelphia – all those people need high-quality medical care.    The city’s economy is growing at an outstanding pace, which is good news for professionals in healthcare and many other industries. Healthcare is one of its dominant sectors, with the largest number of jobs added in recent years. On your days off, you can explore historic sites like Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell or enjoy the extraordinary culinary scene.   Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Philadelphia metropolitan area includes Camden and Wilmington, PA. 

10. San Francisco, California

  • 12,620 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $54,930
  • Average hourly wage: $26.41
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $69,020
It’s no secret that San Francisco is one of the more expensive cities in the US, but medical assistant salaries in the Bay Area are also relatively high. Here, you’ll typically be able to earn more than you would in other cities, so the higher cost of living can be more manageable than you might expect.    The city is home to a diverse population that is categorized as “majority-minority,” meaning that minorities make up more than half of the population. This makes San Francisco an incredibly vibrant and exciting place to live and a place where you’ll be able to meet, interact with, and take care of so many different people.  

11. Washington, DC.

  • 11,440 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $41,240
  • Average hourly wage: $22.45
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $57,480
  Our nation’s capital ranks 11th on our list of the best places to work as a medical assistant. Despite its relatively small geographic size, Washington, DC, is the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the US. Because such a large percentage of residents work for the federal government, DC is often uniquely protected from unemployment and economic dips.    The city is divided into quadrants, containing more than 130 neighborhoods, each with its own personality and ambiance. Of course, you could easily spend weeks seeing the many national monuments and historical attractions in DC, not to mention the galleries, museums, and special events. But even once you’re a seasoned local and an experienced MA, you won’t ever run out of things to do and see.   Note: For the purpose of this guide, the DC metropolitan area includes Alexandria and Arlington, VA.  

12. Boston, Massachusetts

  • 10,210 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $45,280
  • Average hourly wage: $21.77
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $56,840
  As a medical assistant, salary potential in Boston is certainly a plus. Here, the cost of living is somewhat higher than the national average, but so is the earning potential for MAs. It’s also a large and still-growing metro area that will always need a steady supply of skilled healthcare professionals.    Boston ranks exceptionally well on global liveability lists, presenting a long list of benefits for its residents to enjoy. Despite its large size and bustling downtown, Boston still feels remarkably family-friendly and close-knit. You can pick from various neighborhoods to live and work in, from downtown to suburban homes.   Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Boston metropolitan area includes Cambridge and Nashua, MA.  

13. Detroit, Michigan

  • 10,190 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $35,970
  • Average hourly wage: $17.29
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $45,620
  Detroit has long been a major cultural and economic center, earning the title of America’s “Motor City” due to the long-lasting presence of the automotive industry. The cost of living in Detroit is significantly more affordable than the US average, and it’s often described as one of the hidden gems of the US. Here, you can be part of a community that is on the upswing, one where the bright future is bright.   There are more than a dozen major hospitals in the city, including children’s facilities, trauma centers, and university hospitals. There are also several major medical systems with a presence in the city, making up a significant number of healthcare facilities and providers.    Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Detroit metropolitan area includes Dearborn and Warren, MI.  

14. Riverside, California

  • 9,520 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $39,120
  • Average hourly wage: $18.81
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $51,380
  In the last several years, Riverside has welcomed a large number of Los Angeles locals searching for a more affordable lifestyle. As a result, it’s become one of the state’s fastest-growing cities, which benefits anyone searching for medical assisting jobs in California.    Compared to many of the other cities on our list, Riverside is considerably smaller. The welcoming community is more suburban than big-city, which is ideal for those that enjoy a more peaceful way of living. Families and young professionals make up a significant portion of the population, and excellent schools, great neighborhoods, and ample amenities make it easy to see why.   Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Riverside metropolitan area includes Ontario and San Bernandino, CA.  

15. Tampa, Florida

  • 8,800 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $37,780
  • Average hourly wage: $16.72
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $41,170
Wondering if there are jobs for medical assistants in Tampa? The answer is a definitive yes, which is one of the many reasons it’s included on our list.    The cost of living in Tampa is on par with the national average, so it’s an affordable place to live as a MA. As you would imagine, tourism is a big part of the Tampa economy – but healthcare doesn’t fall far behind. There are more than 20 hospitals in the Tampa metro area, multiple cancer treatment centers, four trauma centers, and countless private practice offices. Several Tampa hospitals have been honored among the best in the nation, demonstrating a commitment to an excellent level of care.  Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Tampa metropolitan area includes Clearwater and St. Petersburg, FL.

The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.


The Best Places to Work as a Medical Assistant in 2022 (Part 1)

If you’re considering a career as a medical assistant, your professional future involves fulfilling an essential role in healthcare. Medical assistants have a broad range of responsibilities, helping contribute to the successful operation of a healthcare facility – and ensuring that doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals are able to treat and care for patients effectively.  Some of the responsibilities of a medical assistant may include:
  • Measuring a patient’s vital signs
  • Recording patient history
  • Assisting with basic examinations and treatments
  • Scheduling appointments
  • Preparing samples for lab testing
  • Administering medications
You can work as a medical assistant in many different settings, ranging from private practices to large hospitals and other facilities. It’s a position that is in high demand and one that will always be relevant to today’s healthcare systems.  Anytime you decide to pursue a certain career path, you want to be confident that you’re making the right choice for your future – and medical assisting is no different. So, you may have a number of questions about medical assisting, such as:
  • What is the salary for medical assistants like?
  • What are the best industries for medical assisting jobs?
  • What are the best places to work as a medical assistant?
  • What are some of the different medical assistant jobs out there?
We’ve created a handy guide to answer these questions and others, so you can be ready for the bright and fulfilling future that a medical assisting job can offer.

How Much Do Medical Assistants Make?

Like any career, medical assistant salaries vary depending on the position, geographical location, employer, and other factors. There are specialized medical assistant jobs that may have a higher salary potential. Also, as you gain experience, you can work your way up the salary ladder. 

Best Industries for Medical Assistant Jobs

You might assume that every medical assistant job is the same, but there are actually many different positions across various industries. If you’re searching for the best place to work as a medical assistant, you might want to consider one of these industries/workplaces.
  • Physicians offices
  • Medical and surgical hospitals
  • Outpatient care centers
  • Retirement homes
  • Other health practitioner offices
  • Employment services
There are also medical assistant jobs related to health insurance and similar fields. 

Best States to Find a Job as a Medical Assistant

Did you know that certain states have more medical assisting jobs – and often, higher pay potential – than others? If you’re open to relocating, you have the option to move to a state where medical assistants are in very high demand. Or, you might already live in one of these states.  The top five states for medical assistant jobs are California, Texas, Florida, New York, and Georgia. The rankings are based on a balance of the number of jobs and the average wage. Here is their breakdown, based on information from the BLS
  • California
    • 97,640 jobs
    • Average hourly wage: $21.53
    • Average annual wage: $44,780
  • Texas
    • 69,370 jobs
    • Average hourly wage: $16.66
    • Average annual wage: $34,660
  • Florida
    • 57,210 jobs
    • Average hourly wage: $17.06
    • Average annual wage: $35,480
  • New York
    • 31,360 jobs
    • Average hourly wage: $20.24
    • Average annual wage: $42,100
  • Georgia
    • 26,610 jobs
    • Average hourly wage: $17.05
    • Average annual wage: $35,470
It can be helpful to remember that factors like cost of living mean that a seemingly “lower” wage would equate to the same lifestyle in a more affordable state, compared to a “higher” wage where it’s a little more expensive to live.  If you’re only interested in the states with the highest salaries for medical assistants, and not necessarily which states have the most medical assisting jobs, then the top five are:
  • Washington
  • District of Columbia
  • Alaska
  • California
  • Massachusetts

The Best Cities to Find a Job as a Medical Assistant

Now, you have an idea of the top states for medical assisting jobs – but what about the best cities for medical assistants?  We’ve put together a list of the top cities for medical assistant jobs based on factors that include:
  • Number of medical assistant jobs
  • Average annual salary
  • Cost of living
  • Lifestyle and features of the city
All data used was compiled via the information provided by the BLS.
  1. New York, New York

  • 32,000 medical assisting jobs
  • Average annual salary: $40,020
  • Average hourly wage: $19.24
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $52,160
New York City has more medical assistant jobs than any other metropolitan area in the U.S., making it the best place to work as a medical assistant. When you consider NYC one of the world’s largest cities, it makes sense that the demand for medical assistants would be high – the city needs enough healthcare professionals to keep up with a fast-growing population! There’s no question that New York City is an exciting and dynamic place to live, with a myriad of world-famous highlights to experience. Whether you feel like being a tourist in your own city and exploring Times Square, Central Park, or the Statue of Liberty, or prefer a long walk through your neighborhood, you’ll never run out of things to do and see.  You can also find plenty of opportunities to start (and advance) your medical assistant training. The Allen School has two medical assisting schools in New York City, including our Brooklyn and Jamaica/Queens campuses. You can gain the experience and training you need to get a job as a medical assistant there. Note: For the purpose of this guide, the New York City metropolitan area includes Newark and Jersey City, NJ. 

2.Los Angeles, California

  • 30,120 jobs
  • Average annual salary: $39,750
  • Average hourly wage: $19.11
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $58,780
Like New York City, Los Angeles is among the United States’ largest metro areas – in fact, it’s the second-largest in the country. It’s famously warm and sunny, with beautiful beaches and incredible cultural and ethnic diversity. Los Angeles is also one of the unofficial capitals of health and wellness, so you’ll find a myriad of healthcare providers in the area. As an L.A. local, you can enjoy fabulous shopping, restaurants, and hundreds of museums (more than 800, to be exact!). Attractions such as Hollywood Boulevard, Griffith Observatory, and Venice Beach ensure that you always have something to do. Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Los Angeles metropolitan area includes both Anaheim and Long Beach, CA.

3. Dallas, Texas

  • 22,500 jobs
  • Average annual salary: $35,300
  • Average hourly wage: $16.97
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $45,390
With a thriving economy, mild climate, and a relatively affordable cost of living, Dallas is easily considered one of the best places to work as a medical assistant. The metro area is home to dozens of Fortune 500 companies, constantly attracting new residents – which means that medical assistants will continue to be essential to meeting the needs of the growing city. You can choose to live in the heart of the city or one of the many suburbs surrounding the downtown area. It’s a great option for anyone that likes staying active, as there are many parks, walking trails, lakes, and other outdoor attractions. Dallas is also known for its great schools, making it a great place to raise a family.  Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Dallas metropolitan area includes Arlington and Fort Worth, TX.

4. Houston, Texas

  • 17,070 jobs
  • Average annual salary: $36,250
  • Average hourly wage: $17.43
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $51,320
Houston is the second Texas city to earn a spot on our list of the best places for medical assisting jobs. It’s considered a major hub for medicine, research, and culture alike, earning worldwide recognition for its flourishing biomedical research industry. Houston is also where you’ll find the Texas Medical Center, which is the largest concentration of healthcare and research institutions in the entire world. Like most of Texas, Houston has a fairly affordable cost of living. So, you can easily find a welcoming community and comfortable home in one of the many diverse neighborhoods of Houston, even as a new medical assistant.  Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Houston metropolitan area includes Sugar Land and The Woodlands, TX.
  1. 5. Miami, Florida

  • 16,720 jobs
  • Average annual salary: $37,200
  • Average hourly wage: $17.89
  • Average 90th percentile salary: $49,490
Miami has been ranked among the richest metropolitan areas in the world, and it’s also one of our top cities for medical assistant jobs. With its beachfront location, beautiful weather, and myriad of attractions, it’s no wonder that Miami is the country’s second-most popular tourist destination. Whether you consider yourself a beach lover, museum explorer, or foodie in the making, you can rest assured that Miami has plenty to offer. Well-known for its vibrant nightlife and diverse population, the city of Miami is also relatively affordable in terms of cost of living.  Note: For the purpose of this guide, the Miami metropolitan area includes West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale, FL. Ready to start working towards a new career? The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit  www.allenschool.edu to learn more. Image: Shutterstock Credit to: Billion Photos Release information: Signed model release on file with Shutterstock, Inc.

Phlebotomy Technician Training: What to Expect?

Phlebotomy is an expanding career with tremendous opportunities. According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment openings for phlebotomists have a growth expectation of 22% from 2020 to 2030, a higher rate than most occupations.

The service provided by phlebotomy technicians is critical in diagnosing and treating patients. Phlebotomists are in high demand in hospitals, clinics, communal and regional health centers, and ARC blood centers. Additionally, students who learn phlebotomy gain valuable skills in the health sector that can lead to many careers in healthcare.

Here’s what it takes to learn phlebotomy.

What are the Requirements to Train to Become a Phlebotomy Technician?

A phlebotomy technician conducts intricate work that involves drawing blood from hard-to-locate veins and labeling and maintaining the collected samples. There is a requirement for fine-tuned motor skills to locate veins correctly.

Candidates seeking to venture into phlebotomy require interpersonal skills to calm down patients who express anxiety during the procedure. Phlebotomy is detail-oriented and requires observing safety precautions and handling samples correctly. Although these soft skills are critical, professional training is the ultimate bridge to a phlebotomy career.

Here’s a list of prerequisites required to learn phlebotomy:

  • Be 18 years or older

  • A high school diploma or GED

  • Show proof of all vaccinations

  • Pass drug tests

  • Undertake a background check

A point to note: Remember to check additional requirements required by your school of choice.

How much Does it Cost to Complete Phlebotomy Technician Courses?

Completing a phlebotomy class isn’t expensive compared to your earning potential upon completion. On average, the cost may range from hundreds to thousands of dollars depending on the type of school and length of training. Employers are looking for more well-rounded graduates. Knowing phlebotomy is great. Imagine how much more valuable you will be in the workforce if you also know how to take an EKG, and vital signs, conduct a urinalysis, work the front desk, and understand medical billing and coding.

Moreover, phlebotomy technician training is offered as part of the Allen School of health Sciences medical assistant program which will set you up for success after graduation. Other programs can require 18 months to complete; as an Allen School student, you can complete the program in less than a year. You will receive hands-on training plus 275 hours of internship experience at one of our clinical sites.

What does a Phlebotomy Technician Do?

learn phlebotomy

A phlebotomist or phlebotomy technician is responsible for collecting blood specimens for further examination. Any institution that offers health services requires the service of a phlebotomist to provide evidence-based treatments to their patients.

Some of the frequently asked questions by students seeking to learn phlebotomy include:

  • Is phlebotomy hard?

  • What does a typical day of phlebotomy look like?

  • What does a phlebotomist do?

Here are phlebotomists’ typical tasks and responsibilities that’ll help answer the above questions.

  • Preparing the patient

Before phlebotomists draw blood or any other sample, preparation is vital. First, they have a short investigation with the patient to introduce themselves and confirm they are dealing with the correct patient. Then, they find out potential phobias, allergies, or a history of fainting after a blood drawing procedure.

Lastly, they make sure the patient sits comfortably in a supine position and calm the patient if they are nervous.

  • Drawing blood sample

The phlebotomist selects a sizable, straight, and clear vein during the procedure. At this stage, they observe hand hygiene by sanitizing and using hand gloves for protection against germs and infections.

  • Procedures that follow after drawing blood

Once the phlebotomist has drawn blood from the patient, they perform other follow-up duties such as:

  • Sending blood samples to the lab for testing

  • Applying a bandage to stop bleeding

  • Referring the patient to the next stage for further instructions

  • Cleaning the workstation and sterilizing the equipment

  • Updating the patient’s information in the database

  • Keeping tabs on inventory, e.g., test tubes, needles, alcohol swabs, laboratory forms, and blood vials

Job Outlook for a Phlebotomy Technician

Start Your Phlebotomy Career Today

The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 22% growth in the phlebotomists’ job market from 2020 to 2030. In terms of real-employment figures, the health sector will absorb, on average, 19,500 new phlebotomy technicians every year over the next decade.

The above job openings will arise due to natural socio-economic causes like changing careers, retiring, or transferring to different locations. At the end of 2020, phlebotomy technicians held 129,600 jobs.

Below is a table that shows where phlebotomists will work in the economy as of 2020.

Employer                                                Number of phlebotomy technicians engaged

State, local, and private hospitals             51,000

Medical and diagnostic laboratories       40,000

Ambulatory Care Units                             19,000

Offices of Physicians                                    9,000

Outpatient care centers                               3,000

Others                                                            7,600

Total                                                           129,600

Source: U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics — Occupational Outlook Handbook

Job Outlook for a Medical Assistant

The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an 18% growth in the Medical Assistant job market from 2020 to 2030. In that same time frame, the employment projection averages around 104,400 new medical assistant technicians every year till 2030.

The job openings for medical assistants will change based on individuals changing careers, or retirement. At the end of 2020, phlebotomy technicians held 720,900 jobs.

Medical assistants held about 720,900 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of medical assistants were as follows:

Offices of physicians

57%%

Hospitals; state, local, and private

15%

Outpatient care centers

8%

Offices of chiropractors

4%

Source: U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics — Occupational Outlook Handbook

Start Your Phlebotomy Career Today!

Phlebotomy is a vital function in the health sector which explains the projected growth over the next decade. The Allen School has been a leader in medical assistant programs for over 60 years, training thousands of new healthcare workers like you. Our Medical Assistant Program includes phlebotomy courses to springboard you into your exciting new career in healthcare.

Ready to start working towards a new career? The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.


Tips for Moms Going Back to School to be a Medical Assistant

Going back to pursue your degree as an adult poses its own set of challenges. Going back to school when you’re a single parent can be more difficult. However, daunting it may seem, though, it’s certainly possible. With some extra planning and a bit of knowledge, you can achieve the medical assistant education you need to get ahead and do it on your terms.

Here’s how to make it work.

Do it on your time.

The Allen School of Health Sciences accelerated program is an advantage when your free time is at a minimum. The Allen School of Health Sciences in particular let you schedule your studies around your existing responsibilities and routine. Plus, you have the added benefit of being able to attend classes during the day or at night. By scheduling your studies and schoolwork around your existing career and children’s commitments, you can reach your goals– and potentially do it sooner than you think.

Know that it takes a village.

For single mothers, it’s understood that a support network is integral — especially when considering the prospect of returning to school. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Rally your family, friends, and neighbors, whether it’s for carpooling, childcare, or Internet access in a pinch. Additionally, don’t rule out your school as a source of support. The Allen School of Health Sciences dedicated enrollment advisors, faculty and staff are available to answer your questions and assist single mothers achieving their goals. All can be a great resource in terms of camaraderie, tips, encouragement, and support.

Make it a family activity.

Kids are sponges when it comes to learning. And since they have homework to do, consider doing it at the same time. It’ll not only spark conversation but also set a positive example. It’s an opportunity for you and the kids to support each other — and that’s a win-win.

Take time to recharge.

Sure, you’re Supermom, but even you have limits. Unless you give yourself permission to regroup and regain your strength and mental stamina, it’s impossible to sustain the rigorous schedule required of juggling your life, studies, and career. Besides, exhaustion makes it difficult to retain information. Although it may seem counterintuitive to take breaks and treat yourself when you’re busy taking care of everyone else, you need to — regularly and as a priority. Sometimes, that means taking an afternoon off to spend at the movies or with a good book or simply getting an extra hour of sleep. You deserve a professional position that makes it easy for you to provide for your family. If you're ready to pursue a successful career in the healthcare field and interested in learning more about developing the skills and attributes of a medical assistant. Contact the Allen School today! We are enrolling now for classes starting soon and cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more. -Allen School

What Careers can Phlebotomy Courses Lead to?

Phlebotomy can be a rewarding and exciting role in many different healthcare jobs and is accessible to those who are interested in the healthcare field but do not have a college degree. Many medical assistant careers involve phlebotomy and can also lead to other related positions that could advance your career in healthcare. Phlebotomy experience and other skills you gain from the Allen School Medical Assistant Program can help you move into other healthcare careers – keep reading to learn more.

What is a Phlebotomy Technician?

A phlebotomy technician’s primary responsibility is performing blood draws to collect samples for laboratory testing. The position also includes preparing lab equipment, assessing the patient’s reaction to the blood draw, and collecting blood correctly. Depending on the facility, a phlebotomist may also send blood samples to an offsite laboratory for testing. The Allen School Medical Assistant Program focuses ample time on phlebotomy studies that include learning proper blood draw techniques. The program also offers training in vital signs, urinalysis, EKG testing, and much more to prepare you for a successful career in a medical assisting role, and advancement in the healthcare industry.

Is a Phlebotomy Technician the Same Thing as a Phlebotomist?

Phlebotomist and phlebotomy technician are different titles for the same job. There is no difference in responsibilities. Either title can work in any setting where blood samples are collected, including doctor’s offices, hospitals, clinical labs, and nursing homes.

Careers That Utilize Phlebotomy Skills

Phlebotomy itself can be a solid and rewarding career, but it can also be the first step to other positions in the medical field. The phlebotomy course and other skills learned in the Allen School medical assistant program can lead in many different career directions depending on where you find your interests to be. Your phlebotomy experience from the Allen School medical assistant program will enhance your resume and give you practical experience.

Begin Your Medical Assistant Career Today!

The Allen School has assisted and trained thousands of people for their new careers in healthcare. Contact our team today! Our enrollment is open now for classes starting soon. We look forward to you becoming a part of the Allen School family and alumni. Visit www.allenschool.edu to learn more.  

Image by Microgen/ shutterstock.com


The Central Phoenix Boom in Healthcare and Bioscience

Central Phoenix has been experiencing increased growth in recent years. Home to top medical academic institutions, Phoenix has the potential to become the nation’s healthcare and bioscience hub. The expansion of Phoenix healthcare institutes is critical to the region’s overall economic growth. Thanks to accelerated programs like our medical assistant program, Allen School contributes to this growth. Phoenix Chamber reports that the boom can continue with a focus on retaining and growing existing companies while attracting new ones. Business retention is a critical aspect of Phoenix’s economic strategy as resident companies provide 80% of jobs. Thus, significant growth recorded in the local workforce and companies makes the region attractive to non-resident businesses.

Why Is the Healthcare Industry Booming in Phoenix?

Central Phoenix is the answer to advancements in Healthcare and Bioscience studies. It attracts more companies and a skilled workforce. So, let’s take a closer look into the strategic boom in the Phoenix healthcare industry.

Innovation

Home to the highest number of healthcare workers in Arizona, Phoenix is a perfect ecosystem for healthcare innovation. “Experienced and well-trained workforce is among the top reasons healthcare and bioscience companies select Phoenix,” says Christine Mackay, a director at PCED. Phoenix is central to top healthcare institutions like:
  • Dignity Health’s headquarters
  • Banner Health System’s headquarters
  • St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center
  • Phoenix is the 30-acre Phoenix Biomedical Campus
  • University of Arizona
  • Northern Arizona University
  • Arizona State University
  • Translational Genomics Research Institute
Construction work is nearing completion in the new Creighton University Health Sciences Campus, valued at $100 million. Midtown Phoenix is also home to diverse healthcare organizations, bioscience research centers, one university, and two hospitals. The current spur in Phoenix healthcare is also due to the region’s ease of doing business. Many company employees have their offices in the Park Central Building. The project has attracted more health-related companies and workforce to the region. More construction work is around Park Central, a fundamental attraction for healthcare industry players. The Barrow Neurological Institute headquarters, a high-rise building, will also be sited near Park Central. Phoenix is also home to WearTech medical device lab. Healthcare and Bioscience industries have multiple long-term positive effects on the community. They promote economic growth, creating a substantial positive impact in other sectors.

Infrastructure

Arizona is making giant strides in revamping its healthcare infrastructure. In Phoenix, for instance, the City’s Bioscience healthcare facility is under construction. PCED data shows:
  • The project has a value of $3 billion
  • The portion of the facility under construction is over 4.5 m/sq/ft
  • Over 7000 healthcare jobs to be available in Phoenix
The growth of venture capital funding for bioscience healthcare projects in Phoenix is one of the highest in the country. Hence, more commercial and residential buildings are constructed in the area. Rider Levett Bucknall reports that Phoenix has the fourth-highest number of crane activities in the US. In the last quarter of 2020, over 20 cranes were working in Phoenix. That’s the highest ever recorded. In mid-2020, Phoenix became one of the five cities with more constructions of high-rise buildings. A significant increase compared to the previous year. The boom in Phoenix healthcare and bioscience is not only based on quantity but also on quality. Phoenix has earned a reputation among regions that provide the most reliable medical services, furthering its regard as a medical hub. “The healthcare and bioscience institutes drive economic growth in Arizona,” said Chris Camacho, GPEC CEO. “Besides the thriving workforce and economic activities, Phoenix healthcare institutes provide high-quality services, making the state appealing to workers.” Healthcare is a critical economic sector in Central Phoenix. From the Phoenix Chamber survey, healthcare makes up 3 out of 5 employers in Phoenix. Healthcare creates about 60,000 jobs and adds $8 Billion to the economy. These healthcare companies have received several awards in recognition of their high-quality service.

Choose the Allen School of Health Sciences

The healthcare and bioscience sectors will continue to add significant jobs in Phoenix. One of the ways to ensure the region maintains its position as a leading healthcare provider is a well-trained and experienced workforce. Today’s healthcare employers need competent, skilled, disciplined, and trained employees. The ample supply and availability of skilled labor are excellent for attracting new businesses. Ready to start working towards a new career? The Allen School of Health Sciences is offering virtual campus tours for enrollment for our classes starting soon. Contact the Allen School today! We cannot wait for you to become part of the Allen School family. Visit www.allenschool.edu or call us at (888) 620-6745 to learn more.

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Medical Assistant vs. Medical Office Assistant

The medical industry requires a wide range of staff working together to provide the best care possible for patients. Medical assistants and medical office assistants are essential to keeping practices functioning and organized. This important job makes medical assisting a field ripe with career opportunities. The Allen School of Health Sciences is committed to providing hands-on programs in New York and Phoenix Arizona. Preparing students for successful careers in healthcare. Keep reading to learn more about what a medical assistant training program can mean for your future career in the healthcare industry.  

Medical Assistant vs. Medical Office Assistant: Definition

Both medical assistants and medical office assistants perform similar tasks, but these careers are different enough to deserve their own focus. Medical assistants typically work on a wide range of medical-related tasks, while medical office assistants are more specifically trained to handle the daily functions of the medical office.  

What is a Medical Assistant?

Medical assistants are health care professionals that are competent in a wide range of administrative and clinical tasks. Medical assistants work hard to ensure that offices, clinics, and labs run smoothly so physicians can perform their jobs properly. It is important for a medical assistant to keep organized, have an eye for detail, and be extremely motivated to get their work done.  

What Does a Medical Assistant Do?

Medical assistants help physicians in both the office and exam room. A medical assistant may have many different tasks depending on where they work. An MA has the ability to work with a licensed physician in any field (pediatrics, dermatology, urgent care, cardiology, etc….). They are trained to work the front office as well as the back office and can perform clinical tasks such as EKG, injections, taking blood, urine/blood/chemistry, sterile fields and so much more! —

What is a Medical Office Assistant?

A medical office assistant helps keep the office side of a healthcare facility running smoothly. They typically have excellent communication skills and are good with numbers. They are often very organized, detailed, and motivated, like medical assistants.  

What Does a Medical Office Assistant Do?

Medical office assistants keep the office running through secretarial tasks but have specific medical knowledge beyond a traditional secretary job that allows them to understand the inner workings of hospitals, clinics, and laboratory procedures.  

Medical Assistant vs. Medical Office Assistant: Job Outlook

In addition to the current growth in the medical assistant field, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 19% increase by 2029, but higher than the average 4% of other fields. In Phoenix, Arizona, the projected growth is around 18% by 2030. A 3.2% annual growth gives those interested in becoming a medical assistant or medical office assistant an upper hand at finding a job post-education.  

Job Duties

The job duties between a medical assistant and a medical office assistant are not entirely different. However, a medical office assistant will have more office-related tasks, while a medical assistant may do more tasks in labs and patient rooms.   Typical job duties for a medical assistant include:
    • Answering telephones
    • Scheduling appointments
    • Greeting patients
    • Updating and file patient charts
    • Ordering supplies
    • Arranging for hospital admission and laboratory services
    • Handling billing, collections, and bookkeeping
    • Taking medical histories
    • Recording vital signs
    • EKG
    • Phlebotomy
  Typical job duties for a medical office assistant include:
    • Performing opening and closing office procedures
    • Managing medical records
    • Creating electronic health records
    • Assigning insurance codes for medical diagnoses and procedures
    • Processing insurance claims
    • Performing entry-level bookkeeping and accounting procedures
 

Start by Earning Your Medical Assistant Certificate at Allen School of Health Sciences

If a career in medical assisting or medical office assisting sounds like the right job for you, it is time to take the next step. At Allen School of Health Sciences, our Medical Assistant Program in Phoenix, AZ, is designed to help you get the training you need to succeed in the medical field. This training program is offered at our Phoenix campus, in addition to both our Brooklyn and Jamaica/Queens, NY campuses. Our blended program offers hands on learning with an interactive classroom experience combined with online learning. If you have any questions about our Medical Assistant Program or any of our other programs, contact us today and see how we can help you achieve your career goals in the healthcare field.

Featured Image: lenetsan/Shutterstock


What Does a Healthcare Manager Do?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics projects that healthcare will become the most significant employment sector by 2027. Fortunately, this growth presents a high demand for healthcare managers who are self-driven, innovative, and can perform their duties with ease. In today’s guide, we will explore what a career in Healthcare Management looks like and what a Healthcare Manager does.   Being supportive and compassionate is a top priority being a Healthcare Manager. Healthcare Managers also need good communication skills and excellent business sense. While you may work with a team in this position, you must also be prepared to work alone. Being responsible for upholding your medical facility’s rules, policies, and standards is just one job area.  

What’s the Difference Between Healthcare Management and Other Closely Related Fields?

  Healthcare Management consists of the administration, healthcare managers, and information managers. Some positions in the healthcare management field are covered in our classes. You will gain skills in Human Resources, Informatics, Healthcare trends, and Billing/Coding.   As a Healthcare Manager, you are responsible for the entire facility, specific needs for the facility, and initiatives. Meanwhile, healthcare administration focuses on budgets, staffing, and day-to-day operations.  

How do I Get My Healthcare Management Certificate?

  Are you prepared to be a leader? Do you understand how trends shape today’s healthcare market? Allen School’s Healthcare Management Certificate program has exceptional opportunities available for students to earn optional additional credentials through their coursework and certification exams.  

“How much can I make as a healthcare manager?”

  In this rapidly growing area of the industry, your salary depends on your level of experience, the certificates you have earned, and your specific role within the facility. The state you work in also determines how much you’ll make as a healthcare manager.

Common Healthcare Manager Roles

High-Level Day-to-Day Responsibilities: Healthcare Managers perform various activities, ranging from directing, planning, and coordinating clinicians and practitioners, among other activities, in a hospital setup. Responsibilities also include:</p.  
    • Oversee the routine activities of employees and different working groups.
    • Act as a departmental head overseeing a working department.
    • Coordinate an organization’s system-wide core functions such as revenue, employee satisfaction or efficacy.
  Coordinate Departments and Steer Innovation: Good healthcare and service delivery are any healthcare institution’s core drive. Given the sensitive nature of the healthcare industry, healthcare managers can show they can deliver steady and compliant services by understanding and embracing the following factors:  
    • Stakeholders: A healthcare manager coordinates a host of different stakeholders as they guide them towards a common aim. Stakeholders such as insurance companies, suppliers, doctors, legal teams, and more have a keen interest in a hospital’s standard operating procedure.
    • Policies: In the healthcare industry, policies aren’t constant. They keep changing—and for good reasons—depending on federal and state regulations. Stay on top of these changes as a manager and ensure you communicate them to employees for implementation.
    • Accountability: As a manager, part of your scope of work is the ability to show efficiency in coordinating a healthcare facility’s operations, especially when dealing with health regulatory bodies.
    • Technology: Innovation goes parallel with technology. A healthcare facility needs to keep adapting to new technology to ensure seamless service delivery. But that’s not all; adopting new technology before it gets phased out is one area a healthcare manager prioritizes for the healthcare facility’s best interest.
  Steering the innovation wheel in a hospital starts with careful planning and strategy. When done correctly, managers can expect positive results in patient care handling and other facets of a hospital.    

Team Management

How you manage a team can break or make the success of a healthcare institution. For starters, gaining leadership and team collaboration skills will come in handy. Once you have these skills stacked up in your arsenal, use the following techniques for effective team management:  
  • Healthcare Management acts as a bridge in the day-to-day activities of an organization.
  • They need to be open to change, allow staff to voice their concerns, and embrace a holistic approach to patient care.
  • They must promote better operational strategies your team can use.
  • As you grow into a Healthcare Manager role, you’ll quickly realize that coordinating team initiatives is in your best interest. This way, you can resolve workflow issues without affecting patient care.
 

Influence Healthcare Culture

At a managerial level, Healthcare Managers don’t just influence decisions, but also shape an institution’s culture from the top down. For instance, a manager who embraces gender and racial equality in their places of work will set the right precedent for attaining improved equity. Other ways to influence the workplace culture are:  
  • Have on-site medical translators to ensure service delivery reaches underrepresented groups.
  • Set all-inclusive internal hiring policies for minority groups and people of color.
  • Provide continuous cultural training for employees.
 

Choose the Allen School of Health Sciences

Starting a career in Healthcare Management begins with the proper education. If you’ve been thinking about getting into Healthcare Management as a long-term career path but don’t know where to start, your Medical Assistant Training program may be the right path. At Allen School, we strive to make healthcare education convenient, rewarding, and fun. Get in touch today and become part of the Allen community.